Association for Information Systems

Special Interest Group on Human Computer Interaction

"The premier global organization for academics specializing in Information Systems"

AMCIS

Track Chairs:

Khawaja A. Saeed, Wichita State University,  Khawaja.Saeed@wichita.edu
Na “Lina” Li, Baker College,  nli01@baker.edu
Dezhi Wu, Southern Utah University,  wu@suu.edu

Track Description:

Human‐computer interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary area that has attracted researchers, educators, and practitioners from several disciplines. It essentially deals with the design, evaluation, adoption, and use of information technology, with a common focus on improved user performance and experience. New and exciting research opportunities are emerging, including issues and challenges concerning people’s interactions with various information technologies that can be examined from an organizational, managerial, psychological, social, or cultural perspective. This track welcomes papers that aim at advancing our understanding of human‐computer interaction at an individual, work group, organization, or society levels. Papers may use any type of research methods.


Mini-Tracks:

Interface Design, Evaluation and Impact

Gabe Lee, Miami University, gabelee@miamioh.edu
Anna McNab
, Niagara University, amcnab@niagara.edu

This mini-track is an outlet for human-computer interaction papers that research interface design, evaluation, and impact. It supports a wide-ranging set of research topics, methods, and perspectives. Authors are encouraged to submit new ways of considering HCI in light of emerging technologies and technology trends.

We welcome submissions that fall within the list of topics provided below. A number of papers regarding interface design, evaluation and impact have been published at the premier IS journals in the past. Excellent conference submissions have also been considered for fast-track options at journals publishing HCI research.

Personalization Technologies and Impacts

Hong Sheng, Missouri University of Science and Technology, hsheng@mst.edu
Il Im, Yonsei University, il.im@yonsei.ac.kr

Rapid advancement in Internet and mobile technologies has made personalization common in today’s computing environment. Personalization has been recognized as an important concept in IS research and has received considerable attention from both academia and industry. This mini-track addresses all the issues related to designing, developing, implementing, and evaluating personalization technologies from the technical, behavioral, economic, or managerial perspectives. Through this mini-track, we aim to examine technologies for personalization, users’ attitude, intention, and perception towards personalization, the impacts of personalization, and better ways for personalizing products and services. We welcome empirical research through quantitative or qualitative methodologies, analytical modeling approaches, case studies of implementations, and experimental or prototyping-based studies.

Negative Cognitions about Information Systems

Nick Lockwood, Missouri University of Science and Technology, lockwoodn@mst.edu
Taylor Wells, University of Arizona, taylorwells@email.arizona.edu
Monideepa Tarafdar
, Lancaster University, m.tarafdar@lancaster.ac.uk

There is an emerging dichotomy in how IS-enabled patterns of work and collaboration are affecting IS users. On the one hand they enable vast improvements in decisions and processes. On the other they lead to negative cognition such as stress, frustration and information overload. There has been a recent surge of interest in this area, related, for example, to technostress, addiction, intrusiveness, deceptiveness, credibility, deception and distrust. They explore various facets of detrimental conditions that users of IS experience- conditions that are potentially pervasive, given the ubiquity of IS. The objective of this mini-track is to develop theoretical insight and understanding of HCI topics that address this troubling side of IS use, Submissions on all aspects of this topic are welcome. We encourage conceptual, theoretical or empirical papers.

HCI Issues in Mobility

Kyungsub Choi, Rhode Island College, kchoi@ric.edu
Roderick Graham, Rhode Island College, rgraham@ric.edu

The proliferation of smartphones, tablets, and wireless networks has had a profound impact on consumption of information system based services. The strong affinity to these portable smart devices and technologies are making fundamental changes in both organizational and personal levels. Companies have increased the adoption level of mobile technologies to their enterprise and stepped up their efforts to support the nomadic behavior of their customers by offering applications and services through the mobile platform (Srensen, 2011).

The ‘Technology of Affordances’ theory (Majchrzak and Markus, forthcoming) speaks of “the relational concepts between technology affordance that is defined as what an individual or organization can do with a technology.” The mobility of the smart portable devices affords a fertile ground for a number of new applications and processes.

Our understanding of HCI related issues in the context of smart devices and applications and their mobility and portability is still on-going. This mini-track calls for studies that may shed new light on the subject, and may initiate a knowledge base on comprehending the opportunities and challenges in the area of mobility from the perspective of HCI.

Trust, Privacy and Risk in Information Systems

Tom Stafford, University of Memphis, tstaffor@memphis.edu
Gaurav Bansal
, University of Wisconsin – Green Bay, bansalg@uwgb.edu
Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah
, Missouri University of Science and Technology, nahf@mst.edu
Sherrie Komiak
, Memorial University of Newfoundland, skomiak@mun.ca

We welcome submissions addressing all aspects of trust and distrust in information systems, ranging important areas such as credibility, deception and security, privacy violations and user perceptions. We are particularly interested in evolutions of trust research that consider perspectives of risk and privacy issues. We will be pleased to consider not only empirical research papers but also welcome conceptual and theoretical papers.

Design, Evaluation, and Implication of Online Communication Technologies

Yi (Jenny) Zhang, California State University, Fullerton, jzhang@fullerton.edu
Hyo-Joo Han, Georgia Southern University, hhan@georgiasouthern.edu

With never-ending technological advances to information and communication technologies, communication systems continue to evolve into new forms involving innovative media and applications. The impact of the organizational use of new technologies such as virtual and mixed reality, augmented environment, 3D web deserves further research. Furthermore, employees are increasingly working together in virtual teams with different time zones, different geographic locations and different cultures. Advancements are needed in understanding how information technologies can be leveraged to overcome the workplace difficulties presented by geographic, temporal, and cultural distances.

This mini-track aims to advance the understanding of best theories and practices for designing, evaluating, and using new online communication tools and technologies. Furthermore, many new non-business oriented online communication technologies are transforming social interactions and human networks. It is, therefore, important to analyze cases and examples and conduct experiments where businesses are leveraging public and social electronic communications.

Conference Photo

Track Chairs:

Khawaja A. Saeed, Wichita State University,Khawaja.Saeed@wichita.edu
Na Li, Baker College, nli01@baker.edu
Richard Johnson, University at Albany, State University of New York, rjohnson@uamail.albany.edu

Track Description:

Human‐computer interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary area that has attracted researchers, educators, and practitioners from several disciplines. It essentially deals with the design, evaluation, adoption, and use of information technology, with a common focus on improved user performance and experience. New and exciting research opportunities are emerging, including issues and challenges concerning people’s interactions with various information technologies that can be examined from an organizational, managerial, psychological, social, or cultural perspective. This track welcomes papers that aim at advancing our understanding of human‐computer interaction at an individual, work group, organization, or society levels. Papers may use any type of research methods.


Mini-Tracks:

HCI Issues in Mobility

David Xu, david.xu@wichita.edu
Achita Muthitacharoen, achita.muthita@wichita.edu

Description:

The proliferation of smartphones, tablets, and wireless networks has had a profound impact on consumption of information system based services. Companies have stepped up their efforts to support the nomadic behavior of their customers by offering applications and services through the mobile platform. Our understanding of HCI related issues in the context of smart devices and applications delivered through it is limited. Thus, the main goal of the mini-track is to initiate a knowledge base on comprehending the opportunities and challenges in the area of mobility from the perspective of HCI.

Suggested Topics:

The mini-track is open to theoretical, experimental, survey-based, or field studies that offer interesting and novel theoretical and practical insights on HCI issues in mobility. The specific topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

1. User acceptance of mobile applications
2. Usability of mobile devices and mobile applications
3. Understanding user cognitions, beliefs, and attitudes in the mobile environment
4. Design issues related to mobile devices and applications
5. Understanding mobile services consumption behavior
6. Mobility and workplace productivity
7. Impacts of mobility on social interaction
8. Privacy and security in mobility

Negative Cognitions About Information Systems

Monideepa Tarafdar, monideepa.tarafdar@utoledo.edu
Nick Lockwood, lockwoodn@mst.edu
Taylor Wells

Description:

There is an increasingly persistent dichotomy in the way that emerging Information Systems (IS)-enabled patterns for work and collaboration are affecting IS users. On the one hand, they enable vast improvements in processes and decisions. On the other, they lead to negative cognitions and outcomes such as stress, frustrations and information overload. There has been a recent surge of interest in negative cognitions associated with using IS related, for example, to technostress, intrusiveness and deceptiveness, credibility and deception, addiction to technology use, and distrust. These studies explore various facets of detrimental conditions that users of IS experience—conditions that, given the ubiquity of IS use, are potentially pervasive.

The objective of this mini-track is to develop theoretical insight and understanding on HCI topics and issues that address this “troubling” side of IS. Submissions addressing all aspects of this topic are welcome. We welcome conceptual, theoretical or empirical research papers. We particularly welcome papers that apply theories and perspectives from different disciplines (e.g., theories of stress from psychology, information overload and interruption from information science, and work-life balance from industrial management) to examine various aspects of this phenomenon.

Suggested Topics:

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

1. Implications for design of systems and interfaces regarding: Conceptualizations of troubling or negative interactions between IS and users, such as interruptions, information overload, constant connectivity to work-related information processing, addiction to IS use, and difficulties in learning how to use constantly changing technologies and applications.

2. Implications for design of systems and interfaces regarding: Outcomes from the above interactions such as stress, difficulty in concentrating, multitasking, user dissatisfaction, effects on productivity and performance, disruption of work-life balance, over-dependence on IS.

3. Any other HCI topics related to negative affective responses and the cause and effect relationships between cues embedded in system designs and/or methods that can mitigate or exacerbate those negative responses.

Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC)

Yi (Jenny) Zhang, jzhang@fullerton.edu
Mauricio Featherman, featherman@wsu.edu
Schu Schiller, shu.schiller@wright.edu

Description:

Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) systems enable individuals to communicate with each other via mediating technologies such as private corporate intranets and the Internet. Research in this area is broad and interdisciplinary, examining how human agents use new interactive technologies to perform both business processes and personal interactions. The phenomena of interest to researchers in this area may include but are not limited to: ICTs, virtual communication (such as Lowry, et al., 2009), online communities (such as Posey, et al., 2010), e-mail, network communication, instant messaging (such as Lowry, et al., 2011), group decision-making (such as Lowry, et al., 2010 and Zhang, et al., 2007), videoconferencing (such as O’Hara, Kjeldskov, & Paay, 2011), text messaging, hypertext, distance learning (such as Offir, Lev, & Bezalel, 2008), Internet forums, groups, and distribution lists, and design and analytical methodologies (such as Abbasi & Chen, 2008).

With never-ending technological advances to information and communication technologies, communication systems continue to evolve into new forms involving innovative media and applications. The impact of the organizational use of new technologies such as virtual and mixed reality, augmented environment, 3D web, adaptive and personalized interfaces, and new information visualization techniques deserves further research. Furthermore, employees are increasingly working together in virtual teams that span time zones, and large geographic and cultural differences. The increased commonality of virtual work teams presents both opportunities and challenges to productivity in organizations. Advancements are needed in the understanding of how new information technologies can be used to alleviate communication difficulties presented by geographic and temporal distances.
Suggested Topics:

Given the novelty of many new technologies and their potential for transforming businesses, social communications, and education, the mini-track aims to advance the understanding of best theories and practices for developing, evaluating and using CMC tools and technologies. The minitrack welcomes case studies, experiments, and field studies, which topics include but are not limited to:

• User-centered experience of CMC
• Emerging CMC technologies, their adoption, use, evaluation, and effects
• New design genres examining the CMC used in political, economic, social, and legal contexts
• ICT tools and applications through which social relations are developed, maintained, and grown
• Examining the effects of new tools and technologies that support personal, interpersonal, group, community, and organizational communications
• Theoretical and conceptual frameworks concerning the design, use, and evaluation of innovative CMC tools and technologies
• Electronic communications create new concerns regarding information privacy, interpersonal and business related trust issues, self-disclosure concerns, and other confidentiality issues for employees, individuals and minorities (such as women, teens, GLB)
• Positivist, interpretive, and critical studies of the components, processes, and contexts of emerging and innovative CMC tools and technologies
• Electronic communication for effective teaching and learning

Design, Evaluation, and Implications of Social Networking Applications

Hong Sheng, hsheng@mst.edu
Jinwei Cao

Description:

Social networking applications, such as blogs, instant messaging, podcasts, social networking websites (e.g., Facebook), and virtual world (e.g., Second Life), have become increasingly popular over the past few years. Such applications usually include communication tools to support the capturing, storing and presentation of information/communications among the users, and interactive tools that facilitate interactions among the users. Using these tools, individuals can share information in the online setting and form social networks based on transactions, interest, or relationships. For example, social networking websites such as MySpace.com, Facebook.com and Linkedin.com allow their members to edit a profile page within the site, identify members with whom they share a connection, view the profiles and posts of other members, and send messages to other members. These features facilitate the formation of social networks. Overall, social networking applications are quickly transforming societies by creating a pervasive technical infrastructure that enables efficient development and sustention of social relationships. Social networking applications also have great implications for business. Applications that analyze and present the structure of online social networks provide invaluable knowledge for business to understand and utilize online social networks.

This mini-track aims to address all issues related to social networking applications from the technical, behavioral, or managerial perspectives. In this mini-track, we welcome research that designs and evaluates interface of social networking applications, examines the impact and implications of social networking applications to individuals, teams, and organizations, and proposes methodologies and techniques to identify and analyze social networks. A wide variety of research methodologies are welcome in this mini-track, including prototyping-based studies, analytical modeling approaches, experimental studies, and cases studies.

Suggested Topics:

Example topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

• Theory and design practice of social networking applications
• Methodologies and development techniques on social networking applications
• Usability of social networking applications
• Mobile applications for social networking
• Design features for supporting social network formation
• Design features for supporting social network analysis
• Evaluation of the effect of interface design on social network development
• Analysis of social networking patterns and trends
• Topologies of the social networks
• Visualization and presentation of social networks
• Trust and privacy issues in social networking applications
• The impact of social networking applications on e-Commerce
• Social networking applications in education
• Case studies on social networking applications
• Business implications of social networking applications

Trust in Information Systems

Zhenhui Jiang, jiang@comp.nus.edu.sg
Sherrie Komiak
Fiona Nah, fnah@unlnotes.unl.edu
Tom Stafford

Description:

We welcome the submissions addressing all aspects of trust and distrust in information systems, credibility, deception, privacy violations, and the like. We welcome conceptual, theoretical or empirical research papers.

A user’s trust and distrust in information systems are important components in the interactive relationship between users and their systems. A user has to trust a technology before the technology is adopted and fully used. While there is a rich literature on interpersonal trust, trust in information systems has been under-researched and much of what we know about trust in IS contexts is derived from the interpersonal views promulgated through the organizational behavior research. Hence, the conceptualization of trust in information systems needs to be clarified and expanded to include not only the interpersonal view but also the intermediated views that arise from considerations of the source credibility paradigm from mass communications theory. In this way, the similarities and differences between interpersonal trust and trust in information systems will be better understood. Though concepts and theoretical frameworks from prior literature on interpersonal trust have investigated trust in information systems, the components of trust that are derived from combined source and media effects in the source effects paradigm can explain much of how users interact with and come to trust technology mediated sources in eCommerce, eBusiness and personal contexts. Designing more trustworthy technology requires well-informed research, and the expansion of our understanding of the concept of trust beyond the interpersonal context, for specific use in information systems. What we learn from applying new conceptualizations of the trust construct in information systems will also lead to better understanding of adoption and use of technology-mediated channels for business and personal purposes. From this, new contextual factors can be discerned which may have important moderating effects on key technology outcomes.

Suggested Topics:

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

• Conceptualization of trust and/or distrust in information systems that expands beyond the interpersonal view to include source effects models
• Processes of trust and/or distrust development in information systems
• Theories or empirical studies on the impact of user, task, technology, and contextual characteristics on trust/distrust in information systems
• Theories or empirical studies on the impact of trust in information systems on technology adoption, decision making, website revenue, and customer relationships
• Users’ trusting perceptions of information systems in electronic or mobile business/commerce
• Research on the formation and consequences of privacy concern or privacy violations caused by various information systems
• Conceptual, theories or empirical studies on the impact of credibility or deception in information systems on technology adoption, decision making, website revenue, and customer relationships

Interface Design, Evaluation and Impact

Younghwa “Gabe” Lee, gabe.lee@uni.edu
Na “Lina” Li, nli01@baker.edu
Anna McNab, amcnab@niagara.edu

Description:

This mini-track is an outlet for human computer interaction papers that research interface design, evaluation, and impact. Authors are encouraged to submit new ways of considering HCI in light of emerging technologies and technology trends.

Suggested Topics:

This mini-track supports a wide ranging set of research topics, methods, and perspectives. Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Behavioral, cognitive, and motivational aspects of human/computer interaction
  • User task analysis and modeling
  • The analysis, design, development, evaluation, and use of information systems
    1. Guidelines and standards for interface and interaction design
    2. Novel interaction and interface designs for handheld mobile devices
    3. Interface issues in the development of radical interaction technologies
    4. User studies (including field tests) of interaction with mobile information systems
    5. Usabilityfor the Web and 3-D interface  and interaction techniques
  • HCI security (HCI-SEC) and privacy for interface design and interaction
  • Design of trustworthy user interfaces
    1. Design of interfaces to increase trust and credibility
    2. Design of interfaces to decrease distrust, deception or privacy violations
  • User interface design and evaluation of the Web for
    1. B2B, B2C, C2C E-Commerce or M-Commerce
    2. Government to Consumer or Business E-commerce
    3. Group collaboration
    4. Negotiation and auction
    5. Virtual World (e.g. Second Life)
  • The impact of interface design or usability on the attitudes, behaviors, performance, perceptions, or productivity of individuals, organizations, and society
  • HCI issues related to the elderly, the disabled, and other special needs populations
  • Design and analysis of wearable, pervasive, or ubiquitous systems and computing
  • Issues in teaching and designing HCI courses or programs
  • Human factors issues related to the design and use of information systems
  • Case studies looking at interface or interaction design and usability

A number of papers regarding interface design, evaluation and impact have been published at the premier IS journals in the past. Excellent conference submissions have also been considered for fast-track options at journals publishing HCI research.

We welcome submissions that fall within the above topical list. We also welcome papers that integrate brief demonstrations or interactive discussions of new HCI techniques, methods, or concepts into their AMCIS presentations.

Detroit, MI

Track Chairs:

Paul Lowry, Brigham Young University, paul.lowry.phd@gmail.com
Andrew Burton Jones, University of British Columbia

Track Description:

Human‐computer interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary area that has attracted researchers, educators, and practitioners from several disciplines. It essentially deals with the design, evaluation, adoption, and use of information technology, with a common focus on improved user performance and experience. New and exciting research opportunities are emerging, including issues and challenges concerning people’s interactions with various information technologies that can be examined from an organizational, managerial, psychological, social, or cultural perspective. This track welcomes papers that aim at advancing our understanding of human‐computer interaction at an individual, work group, organization, or society level. Papers may use any type of research methods.


Mini-Tracks:

Trust in Information Systems
Interface, Design, Usability, Evaluation, and Impact
Negative Cognition About IS
Design Considerations for IT Security and Privacy Management
New Venues for Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC)
Design, Evaluation, and Implications of Social Networking Applications
Personalization Technologies and Impacts

Research papers in HCI track can be accessed from here.

Lima, Peru

Track Chairs:

Dezhi Wu, wu@suu.edu
Hong Sheng, hsheng@mst.edu
Na Li, na.li@baker.edu
Robin Poston, rposton@memphis.edu

Track Description:

Human‐computer interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary area that has attracted researchers, educators, and practitioners from several disciplines. It essentially deals with the design, evaluation, adoption, and use of information technology, with a common focus on improved user performance and experience. New and exciting research opportunities are emerging, including issues and challenges concerning people’s interactions with various information technologies that can be examined from an organizational, managerial, psychological, social, or cultural perspective. This track welcomes papers that aim at advancing our understanding of human‐computer interaction at an individual, work group, organization, or society levels. Papers may use any type of research methods.


Mini-Tracks:

Personalization Systems

Il Im, il.im@yonsei.ac.kr
Hong Sheng, hsheng@umr.edu
Dezhi Wu, wu@suu.edu

Computer Mediated Communication: Business Applications, Multimedia, and Social Interactions in the New Digital World

Schu Schiller, shu.schiller@wright.edu
Mauricio Featherman, featherman@wsu.edu

Trust in Information Systems

Zhenhui Jiang, jiang@comp.nus.edu.sg
Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah, fnah@unlnotes.unl.edu
Sherrie Yi Komiak, skomiak@mun.ca
Tom Stafford, tstaffor@memphis.edu

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Younghwa Lee, gabelee@ku.edu
Na Li, na.li@baker.edu
Denise McManus, dmcmanus@cba.ua.edu
Robin Poston, rposton@memphis.edu

HCI and Competitive Advantage

Marilyn Tremaine, tremaine@caip.rutgers.edu
Jan Marco Leimester, leimester@uni-kassel.de

Design, Evaluation, and Implications of Social Networking Applications

Jinwei Cao, jcao@lerner.udel.edu
Hong Sheng, hsheng@mst.edu

Hedonic Information Technologies: Online games, interactive entertainment, and lifestyle computing

Iam MacIness, IMacInne@syr.edu
Paul Benjamin Lowry, paul.lowry@byu.edu

Track Chairs:

Dr. Matt Germonprez, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, germonr@uwec.edu
Dr. Chuck Kacmar, University of Alabama, ckacmar@ua.edu
Dr. Traci Hess, Washington State University,  thess@wsu.edu
Dr. Peter Tarasewich, Northeastern University,  tarase@ccs.neu.edu

Track Description:

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary field that has attracted researchers, educators, and practitioners from different disciplines. HCI has gained attention during recent years due to the rapid development and advancement in information and computer technology. To better use advanced technology, we need to better understand users, their tasks within different contexts, and the interplay among users, tasks, and contexts/environments.

In the MIS field, broad HCI issues and research questions have been investigated over a long period of time. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) or Human Factors studies in MIS are concerned with the ways humans interact with information, technologies, and tasks, especially in business, managerial, organizational, and cultural contexts. MIS researchers study these issues in organizational, business, and personal contexts or take these contexts into consideration in their studies.

The potential interest in an HCI track at AMCIS 2008 is demonstrated by:

  1. The high level of participation in AIS SIGHCI-sponsored conference tracks. SIGHCI currently sponsors/supports HCI tracks/mini-tracks at AMCIS, ECIS, PACIS, ICIS, HCII, and HICSS.
  2. The high level of participation in the HCI tracks/mini-tracks at AMCIS 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007. The last few HCI tracks at AMCIS have each included around 40 papers presented in 13-14 well-attended sessions.
  3. There are approximately 500 current members in AIS SIGHCI.

This increasing trend of interest and enthusiasm was exhibited by the large number of submissions and the high level of participation during the last few years. A meta/mega track is necessary so that (1) it is possible to attend to specific research areas within HCI in MIS, (2) more HCI researchers can be involved, play important organizing roles, and make an impact in this area, and (3) the overall reviewing process for submissions in this area can be more efficiently and better managed.

The aim of this track is consistent with the HCI in MIS track/mini-track in previous years at AMCIS. We want to provide a forum for AIS members to acknowledge each other’s work, and to discuss, develop, and promote a range of issues related to HCI in MIS, including the history, reference disciplines, theories, practice, methodologies and techniques, new development, and applications of the interaction between humans, information and information technology. In an effort to bridge academic research and industry practice, both research articles and experience reports are welcome. The track is open to all types of research methodologies (e.g., conceptualization, theorization, case study, action research, experimentation, survey, simulation). We also welcome visionary articles and research in progress papers.


Special Issue of the International Journal on Human-Computer Studies

(5/21/2008)

We are pleased to announce that the International Journal on Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS) has agreed to publish expansions of the best, completed papers from participating minitracks at the HCI track at AMCIS 2008. Our special thanks go to the Editors-in-Chief of IJHCS, Dr. Enrico Motta and Dr. Susan Wiedenbeck, for their support of HCI research and AIS SIGHCI. Continuing the AIS SIGHCI tradition, we believe that this fast-tracking opportunity with a high-quality refereed academic journal will promote HCI research in the MIS community. The guest editors for this special issue will be Matt Germonprez, Chuck Kacmar, and Gabe Lee.

HCI researchers wishing to participate in this fast-tracking opportunity through the AMCIS HCI track should submit their papers to the participating HCI mini-tracks listed below. SIGHCI’s policies regarding fast-tracking with SIGHCI sponsored special journal issues and best paper awards at conferences are available at http://sigs.aisnet.org/sighci/sig_policies/.


Mini-Tracks:

Hedonic Information Technologies: Online Games, Interactive Entertainment, and Lifestyle Computing

Ian MacInnes
Paul Benjamin Lowry

 

Some of the most dramatic recent developments in computing have been the explosive growth in interactive digital entertainment (IDE), and social and lifestyle computing – or the non-business use of computing for purposes of entertainment, socialization, and lifestyle augmentation. The market for gaming is currently about $7.3 billion dollars, with $936 million in online gaming. Meanwhile, the market for digital entertainment in homes and home automation has reached an all-time high in 2005. These non-business uses of computing represent large and legitimate markets with social implications that are so profound and global in impact that affected societies will never be the same. Gaming has long been an extension of artificial intelligence research, but its many social, economic, and business implications have long been ignored by academic researchers.

Research in interactive digital entertainment and lifestyle computing is even more sparse. Given the magnitude of impact that interactive digital entertainment and lifestyle computing will have on the world, this mini-track will explore and foster unaddressed social, business, and technical research in these areas. These topics are a natural extension of and complement with related research in the HCI track.

Possible Topics: Example topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following aspects of online interactive digital entertainment (IDE) and lifestyle computing:

  • Advertising models with IDE
  • AI techniques for IDE
  • Auctions for online gaming components
  • Automated/smart homes
  • Collaborative gaming
  • Communication techniques and issues of IDE
  • Conflicts between real and virtual worlds
  • Diffusion and adoption of IDE
  • Digital convergence
  • Digital personas
  • E-business of entertainment
  • Economic impact of IDE
  • Gaming communities
  • Gaming currencies
  • HCI aspects of IDE / edutainment
  • IDE agents
  • Immersive gaming
  • Interactive digital storytelling / techniques for interactive narration
  • Interactive theatre
  • Learning through IDE
  • Lifestyle computing
  • Massive social collaboration
  • Measures of IDE
  • Metaphors of IDE
  • Methodologies and development techniques
  • Mixed reality and virtual reality
  • Mobile gaming
  • Models of IDE
  • Novel interfaces
  • Online addiction and anti-social behavior
  • Online environments of IDE
  • Pricing of IDE
  • Privacy and security issues
  • Social blogging
  • Social issues and considerations of IDE
  • Ubiquitous gaming
  • Virtual reality
  • Wearable computing
  • Wireless social computing

Emerging Computer-Mediated Communication Tools/Technologies for Web-based Services

Shu Z. Schiller
Mauricio Featherman


Applications of innovative Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) tools and technologies have reached a new height in support of communications in business and education on the Internet. For example, web-based live text chat and co-browsing have been used to enhance the user experience during online customer service. Agents, avatars, and automatic payment systems have been used to assist users in online purchasing. In addition, hyper video and e-books are now widely used in e-learning, and highly personalized user interfaces using tools, such as RSS and gadgets, are rapidly gaining popularity on the Internet. Given the novelty of these tools and technologies, the theme of the mini-track is (1) to understand and explore the design, use, and evaluation of innovative CMC tools and technologies in web-based services, and (2) to advance theories and construct theoretical models to improve our ability to understand and explain their impact.

Possible Topics: This mini-track encourages theoretical and empirical (both quantitative and qualitative) studies drawing from various research disciplines. Studies using innovative research methodologies or multi-methods are especially welcome. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Development of frameworks and taxonomies for assessing innovative CMC tools and technologies on the Internet
  • Theories and research models concerning the design, use, and evaluation of innovative CMC tools and technologies
  • Applications of innovative CMC tools and technologies in web-based business and education
  • Applications of innovative CMC tools and technologies in interpersonal and group communication via the Internet
  • Impact of innovative CMC tools and technologies on the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations
  • Qualitative analysis of the components, process, and context of innovative CMC tools and technologies

Personalization Systems

Il Im
Hong Sheng
Dezhi Wu


Advancement in technologies (e.g., Internet, mobile and wireless technology, and ubiquitous technology) has made personalization possible and available. Personalization has been recognized as an important concept in IS research and has received considerable attention from both academia and industry. Many practitioners and researchers are investigating into various issues of personalization. Yet, there is a lot to be known about personalization technologies, personalization applications, and their impacts.

This mini-track addresses all the issues related to designing, developing, implementing, and evaluating personalization systems from the technical, behavioral, economical, or managerial perspectives. Through this mini-track, we aim to examine technologies for personalization, users’ attitude, intention, and perception towards personalization, the impacts of personalization, and better ways for personalizing products and services. We welcome empirical research through quantitative or qualitative methodologies, including novel conceptualizations of information systems, analytical modeling approaches, case studies of implementations, and experimental or prototyping-based studies.

Possible Topics:

  • Defining and conceptualizing personalization in e-commerce, m-commerce, and u-commerce
  • Understanding the process of personalization
  • Personalization technologies, such as recommendation systems and intelligent software
  • Theories and models for better understanding of personalization
  • Applications of personalization technologies
  • Factors influencing users’ adoption, acceptance, and usage of personalized products/services
  • Impact of personalization systems on users’ behavior
  • Personalization-Privacy Paradox (e.g.., trade-offs between personalization and privacy concerns)
  • The impact of personalization systems on business
  • Identifying and implementing users’ various personalization needs
  • Best practices of personalization
  • Cross-cultural issues of personalization
  • Metrics for personalization success

Emergency Response Information Systems
(Co-Sponsored by SIGDSS)

Tung Bui
Murray Turoff
Bartel Van de Walle


Any aspect of the design, development, deployment, operation, or evaluation of emergency response systems is appropriate for this mini-track, provided it focuses on the tools, functionality, and/or interface the system provides to human users involved with emergency and crisis response. Also papers that focus on requirements for this environment and/or the impact or relationship of such systems to the behavior of the individuals or organizations involved are equally welcome.

Papers that focus on the underlying technology or hardware of computers, networks, sensors, mobile devices, and their improvements in such areas as throughput, accuracy, and security, should be directed to other appropriate sessions. An exception might be any special purpose input/output device for use by respondents to a crisis situation.

This mini-track is concerned with the functionality that emergency response information system provides for those involved in:

  • Preparedness (analysis, planning, and evaluation)
    • Analysis of the threats
    • Analysis and evaluation of performance (and errors)
    • Planning for training
    • Planning for mitigation
    • Planning for detection and intelligence
    • Planning for response
    • Planning for recovery and/or normalization
  • Training
  • Mitigation
  • Detection
  • Response
  • Recovery/normalization

HCI Issues in Healthcare IT
(Co-Sponsored by SIGHealth)

Nina McGarry
Ann Fruhling
Vance Wilson


In order to comply with changing regulations and to improve support for office staff, clinicians, and patients, healthcare organizations worldwide are currently undertaking massive transformations and additions to their IT infrastructure. History suggests that the success of the healthcare applications that emerge from this process will depend to a large degree on the ability of people to use them effectively and efficiently. Human-computer interaction (HCI) research can provide valuable guidance to improve the usability of healthcare IT. Potential exists for HCI researchers to apply existing knowledge to improving healthcare IT as well as to formulate new theories and practices specific to the healthcare context. The goal of this mini-track is to provide a focused outlet at AMCIS for HCI researchers in healthcare domains to share and discuss the results of their work. Research is welcomed on any HCI topic relating to healthcare IT.

Possible Topics:

  • Innovative HCI design and/or prototyping methods in healthcare
  • Usability engineering for healthcare IT
  • UI evaluation methods in healthcare
  • Behavioral and cognitive aspects of HCI in healthcare
  • Impacts of HCI on success or failure of healthcare IT
  • User interface (UI) design practices for reducing errors in healthcare IT
  • Application of HCI research to improving telemedicine
  • UI development for patient-centered information systems, providing such functions as communication, health records access, and remote monitoring and treatment
  • Accessibility and other HCI issues relating to special needs populations, including elderly patients, the chronically ill, and caregivers
  • Impacts of regulation (e.g., privacy, security, HIPAA) on usability
  • HCI aspects relating electronic medical records (institutional and/or personal)
  • HCI and mobile devices used in healthcare
  • Standards and guiding principles for UI design in healthcare
  • Developing and teaching HCI courses for healthcare IT

Information Visualization and Decision Support
(Co-Sponsored by SIGDSS)

Ozgur Turetken
David Schuff


The abundance of information available to today’s managers makes it essential to efficiently represent, filter, and present information for effective decision making. The rapid advances in hardware and software development have made it possible to present data visually from multiple perspectives. However, the challenge is the design of visualizations such that (1) they are useful in presenting non-numeric as well numeric information, and (2) they are integrated with other components of existing decision support systems.

From that perspective, the topic of information visualization spans several disciplines, including decision support and human-computer interaction. Specifically, the graphical presentation of information applies to an array of topics, such as data modeling, interface design, data mining, and data warehousing. This mini-track will focus on the design, development, and use of information visualization, as well as its ability to function as a tool to aid managerial decision-making.

Possible Topics:

  • Techniques for the organization of information (e.g., clustering)
  • Visual presentation of data mining results
  • Design of visual interfaces that facilitate decision support
  • Evaluation of visual interfaces especially from a decision effectiveness perspective
  • Application of animation techniques to the presentation of information

HCI and Competitive Advantage

Marilyn Tremaine
Jan Marco Leimeister


This mini-track addresses an issue that has been skirted both by the ACM Computer-Human Interaction Community and the AIS-Human-Computer Interaction Community, that is, what value do efforts in human-computer interaction provide to the overall corporation, and what competitive advantage might the skills and activities performed by HCI personnel give to business operations? The mini-track is therefore looking for papers that address this larger issue not just in terms of a return on investment that might be achieved in various focused areas of HCI, e.g., web site development that brings repeat business, but also in areas, such as the redefinition of business processes, the suggestion of new markets, the creation of new products and services, the capture of unique information, the building of brand loyalty, the use of service engineering that ties a product with its service infrastructure, the better management of knowledge throughout the corporation, and the use of HCI in developing successful corporate strategies. Furthermore, information is needed on what are the critical success factors for the management of HCI functions within organizations.

Human-computer interaction, because it has focused on the study of human behavior with the intent of generating appropriate designs that support the smooth integration technology with humans, is a field that is posed to move beyond that of simply running evaluation studies or investigating reasons for individual acceptance or adoption of technology. HCI is a field that has developed a myriad of methods for observing, modeling, and interpreting human behavior in order to obtain technology designs and technology infrastructures that make human activities more productive and products more attractive. These same methods could apply, in the large, to corporate strategy. Similar to work in organizational behavior that has demonstrated that managing human capital appropriately can achieve productivity gains and add significantly to corporate knowledge, there exist demonstrations in human-computer interaction that illustrate that it, too, has these same potentials. A classic example is that of making interfaces usable enough so that data entry work is done by customers rather than hired personnel. Another example exists in the redesign of workflow in collaborative work research which uses computer interfaces to manage complex work re-direction negotiations. A third example exists in software development wherein software update management systems take over monitoring functions enabling a company to pursue the cost advantages of virtual teams.

Possible topics:

  • Return on investment for employing usability evaluation
  • Cost-benefit tradeoffs in using human-computer interaction techniques
  • Case studies of the strategic use of HCI
  • Case studies on and success factors for managing the HCI function in organizations
  • Empirical studies of business process change introduced and enabled by HCI
  • Empirical studies of web-based code that gives better customer service than competitors, e.g., recommender systems
  • Empirical studies of “tagging” uses that collect useful and privately owned data
  • HCI-related business models
  • Recognition of emerging markets in new technologies and services based on HCI investigations

Trust in Information Technology

Sherrie Y. X. Komiak
Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah


A user’s trust in information technology is an important component in the relationship between the user and the information technology. A user has to trust a technology before the technology is adopted and fully used. While there is a rich literature on interpersonal trust, trust in information technology has been under researched. First, the conceptualization of trust in information technology needs to be clarified and constructed. The similarities and differences between interpersonal trust and trust in information technology need to be better understood. The extent to which concepts and theoretical frameworks from prior literature on interpersonal trust is applicable to research on trust in information technology is still unclear. Second, designing a more trustworthy technology deserves further research. Trust in information technology is an important HCI (Human-Computer interaction) research area. Third, trust in information technology may also have different impact on adoption of different technologies and could be moderated by organizational and contextual factors.

Submissions addressing all aspects of trust in information technology are welcome. We welcome conceptual, theoretical, or empirical research papers in this area.

Possible Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Conceptualization of trust in information technology
  • Processes of trust development in information technology/systems
  • Theories or empirical studies on the impact of user, task, technology, and contextual characteristics on trust in information technology
  • Theories or empirical studies on the impact of trust in information technology on technology adoption, decision making, website revenue, and customer relationships
  • Trust in information technologies in electronic or mobile business/commerce

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Matt Germonprez
Chuck Kacmar
Younghwa “Gabe” Lee
Denise McManus


HCI papers that do not fall into any of the above mini-tracks should be submitted to the Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact mini-track. This mini-track is open to all topics and issues dealing with HCI, implemented on any platforms or technologies (e.g., desktop, laptop, or handheld devices, stationary, or mobile systems). Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The behavioral, cognitive, and motivational aspects of human/computer interaction
  • User task analysis and modeling
  • The analysis, design, development, evaluation, and use of information systems
    • Guidelines and standards for interface design
    • Novel interaction and interface designs for handheld mobile devices (e.g., phones or PDAs)
    • Interface issues in the development of radical interaction technologies
    • User studies (including field tests) of interaction with mobile information systems
    • Information system usability engineering
    • Development of new usability testing methods for interface designs and interaction techniques
  • HCI security (HCI-SEC) and privacy for interface design and interaction
  • User interface design and evaluation of the Web for:
    • B2B, B2C, C2C E-Commerce or M-Commerce
    • Group collaboration
    • Negotiation and auction
  • The impact of interfaces/information technology on attitudes, behavior, performance, perception, and productivity
  • Implications and consequences of technological change on individuals, groups, society, and socio-technical units
  • HCI issues related to the elderly, the disabled, and other special needs populations
  • Issues in teaching and designing HCI courses or programs
  • Human factors issues related to HCI
  • Case studies looking at interface or interaction design and usability

Track Chairs:

Dr. Matt Germonprez, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, germonr@uwec.edu
Dr. Traci Hess, Washington State University,  thess@wsu.edu
Dr. Peter Tarasewich, Northeastern University,  tarase@ccs.neu.edu

Track Description:

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary field that has attracted researchers, educators, and practitioners from different disciplines. HCI has gained attention during recent years due to the rapid development and advancement in information and computer technology. To better use advanced technology, we need to better understand users, their tasks within different contexts, and the interplay among users, tasks, and contexts/environments.

In the MIS field, broad HCI issues and research questions have been investigated over a long period of time. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) or Human Factors studies in MIS are concerned with the ways humans interact with information, technologies, and tasks, especially in business, managerial, organizational, and cultural contexts. MIS researchers study these issues in organizational, business, and personal contexts or take these contexts into consideration in their studies.

The high level of interest exhibited by MIS scholars in broad HCI studies has been demonstrated in many ways:

  1. The high number of hits from queries to the ISWORLD Faculty Directory on research and teaching in HCI related areas (see Zhang et al., 2002 in CAIS);

  2. The high level of participation in HCI specific events sponsored by the AIS SIGHCI (please refer to http://sigs.aisnet.org/sighci for more information);

  3. The high level of participation in the HCI track/minitrack at AMCIS 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, and 2006. At the last five AMCIS conferences, the HCI in MIS track (or minitrack prior to AMCIS 2004) was among the most popular ones at AMCIS.

This increasing trend of interest and enthusiasm was exhibited by the large number of submissions and the high level of participation during the last few years. A meta/mega track is necessary so that (1) it is possible to attend to specific research areas within HCI in MIS, (2) more HCI researchers can be involved, play important organizing roles, and make an impact in this area, and (3) the overall reviewing process for submissions in this area can be more efficiently and better managed.

The aim of this track is consistent with the HCI in MIS track/minitrack in previous years at AMCIS. We want to provide a forum for AIS members to acknowledge each other’s work, and to discuss, develop, and promote a range of issues related to HCI in MIS, including the history, reference disciplines, theories, practice, methodologies and techniques, new development, and applications of the interaction between humans, information and information technology. In an effort to bridge academic research and industry practice, both research articles and experience reports are welcome. The track is open to all types of research methodologies (e.g., conceptualization, theorization, case study, action research, experimentation, survey, simulation). We also welcome visionary articles and research in progress papers.


Special Issue of the DATA BASE for Advances in Information Systems

(1/25/2007)

We are pleased to announce that The DATA BASE for Advances in Information Systems (DATA BASE) has agreed to publish expansions of the best, completed papers from participating minitracks at the HCI track at AMCIS 2007. Our special thanks go to the co-editors of DATA BASE, Dr. Tom Stafford and Dr. Patrick Chau, for their support of HCI research and AIS SIGHCI. Continuing the AIS SIGHCI tradition, we believe that this fast-tracking opportunity with a high-quality refereed academic journal will promote HCI research in the MIS community. The guest editors for this special issue will be Matt Germonprez, Traci Hess, Nancy Russo, and Chuck Kacmar.

HCI researchers wishing to participate in this fast-tracking opportunity should submit their papers to the participating HCI mini-tracks listed below. SIGHCI’s policies regarding fast-tracking with SIGHCI sponsored special journal issues and best paper awards at conferences are available at http://sigs.aisnet.org/sighci/sig_policies/.


Mini-Tracks:

Hedonic Information Technologies: Online Games, Interactive Entertainment, and Lifestyle Computing

Ian MacInnes
Paul Benjamin Lowry
Greg Moody
Taylor Wells


Some of the most dramatic recent developments in computing have been the explosive growth in interactive digital entertainment (IDE), and social and lifestyle computing – or the non-business use of computing for purposes of entertainment, socialization, and lifestyle augmentation. The market for gaming is currently about $7.3 billion dollars, with $936 million in online gaming. Meanwhile, the market for digital entertainment in homes and home automation has reached an all-time high in 2005. These non-business uses of computing represent large and legitimate markets with social implications that are so profound and global in impact that affected societies will never be the same.

Gaming has long been an extension of artificial intelligence research, but its many social, economic, and business implications have long been ignored by academic researchers. Research in interactive digital entertainment and lifestyle computing is even more sparse. Given the magnitude of impact that interactive digital entertainment and lifestyle computing will have on the world, this minitrack will explore and foster unaddressed social, business, and technical research in these areas. These topics are a natural extension of and complement with related research in the HCI track.

Example topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following aspects of online interactive digital entertainment (IDE) and lifestyle computing:

  • Advertising models with IDE
  • AI techniques for IDE
  • Auctions for online gaming components
  • Automated/smart homes
  • Collaborative gaming
  • Communication techniques and issues of IDE
  • Conflicts between real and virtual worlds
  • Diffusion and adoption of IDE
  • Digital convergence
  • Digital personas
  • E-business of entertainment
  • Economic impact of IDE
  • Gaming communities
  • Gaming currencies
  • HCI aspects of IDE/edutainment
  • IDE agents
  • Immersive gaming
  • Interactive digital storytelling / techniques for interactive narration
  • Interactive theatre
  • Learning through IDE
  • Lifestyle computing
  • Massive social collaboration
  • Measures of IDE
  • Metaphors of IDE
  • Methodologies and development techniques
  • Mixed reality and virtual reality
  • Mobile gaming
  • Models of IDE
  • Novel interfaces
  • Online addiction and anti-social behavior
  • Online environments of IDE
  • Pricing of IDE
  • Privacy and security issues
  • Social blogging
  • Social issues and considerations of IDE
  • Ubiquitous gaming
  • Virtual reality
  • Wearable computing
  • Wireless social computing

Emerging Computer-Mediated Communication Tools/Technologies for Web-based Services

Shu Z. Schiller


Applications of innovative Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) tools and technologies have reached a new height in support of communications in business and education on the Internet. For example, web-based live text chat and co-browsing have been used to enhance the user experience during online customer service. Agents, avatars, and automatic payment systems have been used to assist users in online purchasing. In addition, hyper video and e-books are now widely used in e-learning, and highly personalized user interfaces using tools such as RSS and gadgets are rapidly gaining popularity on the Internet.

Given the novelty of these tools and technologies, the theme of the mini-track is (1) to understand and explore the design, use, and evaluation of innovative CMC tools and technologies in web-based services, and (2) to advance theories and construct theoretical models to improve our ability to understand and explain their impact.

Possible Topics:

This mini-track encourages theoretical and empirical (both quantitative and qualitative) studies drawing from various research disciplines. Studies using innovative research methodologies or multi-methods are especially welcome. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Development of frameworks and taxonomies for assessing innovative CMC tools and technologies on the Internet
  • Theories and research models concerning the design, use, and evaluation of innovative CMC tools and technologies
  • Applications of innovative CMC tools and technologies in web-based business and education
  • Applications of innovative CMC tools and technologies in interpersonal and group communication via the Internet
  • Impact of innovative CMC tools and technologies on the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations
  • Qualitative analysis of the components, process, and context of innovative CMC tools and technologies

Personalization Systems

Il Im
Hong Sheng


Advancement in technologies (e.g., Internet, mobile and wireless technology, and ubiquitous technology) has made personalization possible and available. Personalization has been recognized as an important concept in IS research and has received considerable attention from both academia and industry. Many practitioners and researchers are investigating into various issues of personalization. Yet, there is a lot to be known about personalization technologies, personalization applications, and their impacts.

This mini-track addresses all the issues related to designing, developing, implementing, and evaluating personalization systems from the technical, behavioral, economical, or managerial perspectives. Through this mini-track, we aim to examine technologies for personalization, users’ attitude, intention, and perception towards personalization, the impacts of personalization, and better ways for personalizing products and services. We welcome empirical research through quantitative or qualitative methodologies including novel conceptualizations of information systems, analytical modeling approaches, case studies of implementations and experimental or prototyping-based studies.

Possible Topics:

  • Defining and conceptualizing personalization in e-commerce, m-commerce, and u-commerce
  • Understanding the process of personalization
  • Personalization technologies such as recommendation systems and intelligent software
  • Theories and models for better understanding of personalization
  • Applications of personalization technologies
  • Factors influencing users’ adoption, acceptance and usage of personalized products/services
  • Impact of personalization systems on users’ behavior
  • Personalization-Privacy Paradox (e.g.., trade-offs between personalization and privacy concerns)
  • The impact of personalization systems on business
  • Identifying and implementing users’ various personalization needs
  • Best practices of personalization
  • Cross-cultural issues of personalization
  • Metrics for personalization success

Emergency Response Information Systems (Co-Sponsored by SIGDSS)

Tung Bui
Murray Turoff
Bartel Van de Walle


Any aspect of the design, development, deployment, operation, or evaluation of emergency response systems are appropriate for this mini-track provided it focuses on the tools, functionality, and/or interface the system provides to human users involved with emergency and crisis response. Also papers that focus on requirements for this environment and/or the impact or relationship of such systems to the behavior of the individuals or organizations involved are equally welcome.

Papers that focus on the underlying technology or hardware of computers, networks, sensors, mobile devices and their improvements in such areas as throughput, accuracy, and security, should be directed to other appropriate sessions. An exception might be any special purpose input/output device for use by respondents to a crisis situation.

This mini-track is concerned with the functionality that Emergency Response Information System provides for those involved in:

  • Preparedness (analysis, planning, and evaluation)
    • Analysis of the threats
    • Analysis and evaluation of performance (and errors)
    • Planning for training
    • Planning for mitigation
    • Planning for detection and intelligence
    • Planning for response
    • Planning for recovery and/or normalization
  • Training
  • Mitigation
  • Detection
  • Response
  • Recovery/normalization

HCI Issues in Healthcare IT (Co-Sponsored by SIGHealth)

Vance Wilson
Nina McGarry
Ann Fruhling


In order to comply with changing regulations and to improve support for office staff, clinicians, and patients, healthcare organizations worldwide are currently undertaking massive transformations and additions to their IT infrastructure. History suggests that the success of the healthcare applications that emerge from this process will depend to a large degree on the ability of people to use them effectively and efficiently. Human-computer interaction (HCI) research can provide valuable guidance to improve the usability of healthcare IT. Potential exists for HCI researchers to apply existing knowledge to improving healthcare IT as well as to formulate new theories and practices specific to the healthcare context. The goal of this minitrack is to provide a focused outlet at AMCIS for HCI researchers in healthcare domains to share and discuss the results of their work. Research is welcomed on any HCI topic relating to healthcare IT.

Possible Topics:

  • Innovative HCI design and/or prototyping methods in healthcare
  • Usability engineering for healthcare IT
  • UI evaluation methods in healthcare
  • Behavioral and cognitive aspects of HCI in healthcare
  • Impacts of HCI on success or failure of healthcare IT
  • User interface (UI) design practices for reducing errors in healthcare IT
  • Application of HCI research to improving telemedicine
  • UI development for patient-centered information systems, providing such functions as communication, health records access, and remote monitoring and treatment
  • Accessibility and other HCI issues relating to special needs populations, including elderly patients, the chronically ill, and caregivers
  • Impacts of regulation (e.g., privacy, security, HIPAA) on usability
  • HCI aspects relating electronic medical records (institutional and/or personal)
  • HCI and mobile devices used in healthcare
  • Standards and guiding principles for UI design in healthcare
  • Developing and teaching HCI courses for healthcare IT

Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices (Co-Sponsored by SIGE-BIZ)

Peter Tarasewich
Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah


Mobile applications are having a profound impact on organizations and individuals. Organizations no longer need to provide every employee with a wired connection to perform their job functions. Individuals can use mobile devices to access the information systems they need anywhere at anytime. But mobility and mobile device use is also adding to problems of information overload. Information management becomes more difficult and complex in mobile environments as well. Since mobile devices can be taken anywhere, the user’s environment can change rapidly from moment to moment. There can also be a significant number of people, objects, and activities vying for a user’s attention aside from the mobile application itself.

Designing effective interaction methods is a challenging part of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), and mobile devices make this challenge even greater. Mobile applications require efficient ways to record and access information under circumstances that are often quite different from those where desktop computers are used. The purpose of this mini-track is to provide a forum for examining how people interact with mobile information systems and the devices that are used to access them. Submissions addressing all aspects of HCI with mobile devices are welcome.

Possible Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Novel interaction and interface design for mobile devices (e.g., phones, PDAs)
  • Usability testing methods for wireless applications
  • HCI security (HCI-SEC) for mobile devices and interactions
  • Field tests of mobile information systems
  • Case studies looking at the design and usability of mobile applications
  • Formal user studies of mobile device interaction techniques
  • Designing privacy into mobile applications and devices
  • Notification cues and information displays for handheld devices
  • Wearable systems and computing
  • Input and output methods for small and ultra-mobile devices (e.g., PDA’s, watches, rings)

Information Visualization and Decision Support (Co-Sponsored by SIGDSS)

David Schuff
Ozgur Turetken


The abundance of information available to today’s managers makes it essential to efficiently represent, filter, and present information for effective decision making. The rapid advances in hardware and software development have made it possible to present data visually from multiple perspectives. However, the challenge is the design of visualizations such that (1) they are useful in presenting non-numeric as well numeric information, and (2) they are integrated with other components of existing decision support systems.

From that perspective, the topic of information visualization spans several disciplines, including decision support and human-computer interaction. Specifically, the graphical presentation of information applies to an array of topics such as data modeling, interface design, data mining, and data warehousing. This mini-track will focus on the design, development, and use of information visualization, as well as its ability to function as a tool to aid managerial decision-making.

Possible topics:

  • Techniques for the organization of information (e.g., clustering)
  • Visual presentation of data mining results
  • Design of visual interfaces that facilitate decision support
  • Evaluation of visual interfaces especially from a decision effectiveness perspective
  • Application of animation techniques to the presentation of information

HCI and Competitive Advantage

Marilyn Tremaine
Jan Marco Leimeister


This Mini-Track addresses an issue that has been skirted both by the ACM Computer-Human Interaction Community and the AIS-Human-Computer Interaction Community, that is, what value do efforts in human-computer interaction provide to the overall corporation, and what competitive advantage might the skills and activities performed by HCI personnel give to business operations? The Mini-Track is therefore looking for papers that address this larger issue not just in terms of a return on investment that might be achieved in various focused areas of HCI, e.g., web site development that brings repeat business, but also in areas such as the redefinition of business processes, the suggestion of new markets, the creation of new products and services and the influence on corporate strategies. Furthermore information is needed on what are the critical success factors for the management of HCI functions within organizations.

Human-Computer Interaction, because it has focused on the study of human behavior with the intent of generating appropriate designs that support the smooth integration technology with humans, is a field that is posed to move beyond that of simply running evaluation studies or investigating reasons for individual acceptance or adoption of technology. HCI is a field that has developed a myriad of methods for observing, modeling and interpreting human behavior in order to obtain technology designs and technology infrastructures that make human activities more productive. These same methods could apply, in the large, to corporate strategy. Similar to work in organizational behavior that has demonstrated that managing human capital appropriately can improve productivity, there exist demonstrations in human-computer interaction that would illustrate that it, too, has the potential to increase productivity. A classic example is that of making interfaces usable enough so that data entry work is done by customers rather than hired personnel. Another example exists in the redesign of workflow in collaborative work research which uses computer interfaces to manage complex work re-direction negotiations. A third example exists in software development wherein software update management systems take over monitoring functions enabling a company to pursue the cost advantages of virtual teams.

Possible Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Return on Investment for employing usability evaluation
  • Cost-benefit tradeoffs in using human-computer-interaction techniques
  • Case studies of the strategic use of HCI
  • Case studies on and success factors for managing the HCI function in organizations
  • Empirical studies of business process change introduced and enabled by HCI
  • HCI-related business models
  • Recognition of emerging markets in new technologies and services based on HCI investigations

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Matt Germonprez
Traci Hess
Younghwa ‘Gabe’ Lee


HCI papers that do not fall into any of the above minitracks should be submitted to the HCI minitrack. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The behavioral, cognitive, and motivational aspects of human/computer interaction
  • User task analysis and modeling
  • The analysis, design, development, evaluation, and use of information systems
  • Guidelines and standards for interface design
  • User interface design and evaluation of the Web for
    • B2B, B2C, C2C E-Commerce
    • Group collaboration
    • Negotiation and auction
  • Design and evaluation issues for small screen devices and M-Commerce
  • Interface issues in the development of other new interaction technologies
  • Information system usability engineering
  • The impact of interfaces/information technology on attitudes, behavior, performance, perception, and productivity
  • Implications and consequences of technological change on individuals, groups, society, and socio-technical units
  • Issues related to the elderly, the young and special needs populations
  • Issues in teaching HCI courses
  • Other human factors issues related to HCI

Track Chairs:

Dr. Matt Germonprez, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, germonr@uwec.edu
Dr. Traci Hess, Washington State University,  thess@wsu.edu
Dr. Scott McCoy, College of William and Mary, scott.mccoy@business.wm.edu
Dr. Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, fnah@unl.edu

Track Description:

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary field that has attracted researchers, educators, and practitioners from different disciplines. HCI has gained attention during recent years due to the rapid development and advancement in information and computer technology. To better use advanced technology, we need to better understand users, their tasks within different contexts, and the interplay among users, tasks, and contexts/environments.

In the MIS field, broad HCI issues and research questions have been investigated over a long period of time. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) or Human Factors studies in MIS are concerned with the ways humans interact with information, technologies, and tasks, especially in business, managerial, organizational, and cultural contexts. MIS researchers are interested in macro level analyses and issues, and they study these issues in the organizational/business contexts or take these contexts into consideration in their studies.

The high level of interest exhibited by MIS scholars in broad HCI studies has been demonstrated in many ways:

  1. The high number of hits from queries to the ISWORLD Faculty Directory on research and teaching in HCI related areas (see Zhang et al., 2002 in CAIS);
  2. The high level of participation in HCI specific events sponsored by the AIS SIGHCI (please refer to http://sigs.aisnet.org/sighci for more information);
  3. The high level of participation in HCI minitrack/track at AMCIS 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. At the last four AMCIS conferences, the HCI in MIS minitrack (which became the HCI in MIS track at AMCIS 2004) was among the most popular ones at AMCIS.

This increasing trend of interest and enthusiasm was exhibited by the large number of submissions and the high level of participation during the last few years. A meta/mega track is necessary so that (1) it is possible to attend to specific research areas within HCI in MIS, (2) more HCI researchers can be involved, play important organizing roles, and make an impact in this area, and (3) the overall reviewing process for submissions in this area can be more efficiently and better managed.

The aim of this track is consistent with the HCI in MIS track/minitrack in previous years at AMCIS. We want to provide a forum for AIS members to acknowledge each other’s work, and to discuss, develop, and promote a range of issues related to HCI in MIS, including the history, reference disciplines, theories, practice, methodologies and techniques, new development, and applications of the interaction between humans, information and information technology. In an effort to bridge academic research and industry practice, both research articles and experience reports are welcome. The track is open to all types of research methodologies (e.g., conceptualization, theorization, case study, action research, experimentation, survey, simulation). We also welcome visionary articles and research in progress papers..


Special Issue of the Information Systems Journal

(1/27/2006)

We are very pleased to announce that the Information Systems Journal (ISJ) will be publishing expansions of the best papers from participating mini-tracks of the HCI track at AMCIS 2006. Our special thanks go to the co-editors of ISJ, Dr. Guy Fitzgerald and Dr. David Avison, for their support of HCI research and AIS SIGHCI. Continuing the AIS SIGHCI tradition, we believe that this fast-tracking opportunity with a high-quality refereed academic journal will promote HCI research in the MIS community. The guest editors for this special issue will be Nancy Russo, Matt Germonprez, Traci Hess, and Scott McCoy.

HCI researchers wishing to participate in this fast-tracking opportunity should submit their papers to one of the participating HCI mini-tracks listed below. SIGHCI’s policies regarding fast-tracking with SIGHCI sponsored special journal issues and best paper awards at conferences are available at http://sigs.aisnet.org/sighci/sig_policies/.


Mini-Tracks:

HCI Education for IS Professionals


Mary Jo Davidson


A substantial number of information systems (IS) projects now require the design and development of a user interaction component or the enhancement of an existing component. This requires that the project team include a user advocate. In some cases, a Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) practitioner fills that role, but especially on small teams, the user advocate may be an IS professional. Even if an HCI practitioner is a team member, the work required as a user advocate may conflict with the roles of other team members.

Exposure to HCI concepts and the development of professional respect for HCI practitioners (and vice versa), via educational experiences, should lead to a shared vocabulary, greater team productivity, and improved project end-results for the user. Any opportunities to increase these three results are of interest in the areas of information systems research and practice.

Potential topics include:

  • Another Digital Divide – Not everyone can set the VCR and why that matters.
  • Team work – A basis in shared vocabulary
  • The role of the user advocate
  • Case studies of current HCI education for IS students
  • A Timely Discussion – The assumption that everyone is “on the Web” negatively impacted recovery from Hurricane Katrina for many individuals. How could an understanding of users and HCI have helped prevent this?

HCI Models and Issues in Intelligent Information Seeking Engines

Richard E. (Rick) Downing


For information seeking to be effective, it should perhaps be conceptualized as a problem solving process, rather than a search for key terms. In order to address the problem solving characteristics of information seeking, the user interface in the electronic information seeking environment should be able to provide methods for conducting natural language conversations between the user(s) and the system. Information problems should be addressed incrementally with the system providing feedback that would help the user narrow or broaden the scope of their search or increase domain knowledge regarding the topic of their search. In this way, the user can incrementally enhance their understanding of both the problem and potential solutions. Thus, search engines of the future should conduct an interactive conversation with the information seeker while incrementally narrowing the search with each conversational exchange with the user and providing an incrementally finer description of the type of information sought prior to beginning the search.

Email spam can be greatly reduced through the use of Bayesian spam filters. These innovative agents learn from both spam email and acceptable email, assigning scores to various aspects of the content of each message and determining whether to reject an email message based upon the overall score. Great progress has also been made in the use of both semantic web designs and ontologies. Perhaps it is time to reverse the paradigm from one in which humans query the system to one in which the system queries humans.

Relevance for MIS
The development of intelligent information seeking engines has broad implications for library information systems, knowledge management systems, database systems used in support of decision support and data mining, as well as for general use in Internet searching. We are seeking original research that develops, tests, advances, or applies theory, research, and knowledge to all areas of intelligent information seeking technology. Articles with both strong theoretical foundations and significant practical implications are highly encouraged. Conceptual models, literature reviews, exploratory research, descriptive surveys, methodological studies, applied research, and replications or extensions of past research are of interest if they make an important contribution to human problem solving, intelligent agent, or AI theory, research, or knowledge, and provide insight for academic application or business practice. All types of rigorous methods (quantitative, qualitative, or combination) are acceptable.

Suggested Topics
Some suggested topics are listed below. Questions regarding the suitability of your topic should be addressed to the mini-track chair.

  • Human problem solving processes
  • Intelligent search agents
  • Artificial intelligence and information seeking
  • Ontologies and information seeking
  • Innovative uses of Bayesian filters
  • Cognitive processes (or constraints) in information seeking
  • Interactive user interfaces
  • Semantic web engines
  • Natural language filters

Human Cognition in Computing

Tom Stafford


HCI research has traditionally viewed behavioral theory as the crux of understanding user perceptions and motivations in computing. Behavioral theory as we know it in HCI research is limited in its exposure to a rich and fruitful school of thinking known as Social Cognition in the psychology literature. Judgments, decision making, and visual perceptions are all well understood and reasonably reliable in testing in the social cognition studies of priming, person perception, and social judgment. Exposing the IT research community to this mature and robust field of reference discipline theory will provide for fresh and important perspectives as we begin to examine computer mediated social interactions, computer persuasion, and user perceptions of the trustworthiness of computer media sources.

Introduction to Minitrack
Increasingly, investigations of HCI are considering issues of perception, judgment, decision making, and attitude formation with regard to the interface and its usefulness to users. The body of literature that we typically draw from has not frequently referenced important areas of inquiry in social psychology related to judgment and decision making, while emerging areas of HCI inquiry have sufficiently broadened to include topics relevant to human cognition as part of the computer system and human perception and judgments about system interfaces. This minitrack would develop expository work based on psychological studies of human thought and judgment, so that we can begin understanding the operation of the human element of information systems from a richer theoretical perspective.

Theme
The theme of the minitrack revolves around understanding how people think, specifically, how users think about computers, with an aim toward developing better conceptualizations of human operators in synergy with their computer systems tools. As research begins to consider aspects of affect, anthropomorphic interfaces, and AI integration into systems that human operators interface with, we are increasingly entering new theoretical territory that is not yet well explained on the basis of our current HCI literature streams. Drawing from social cognition scholarship in judgment and decision making, as well as theories of perception and attitude formation, will enable the community of HCI scholars to better conceptualize the inter-relationship between human thought processes and systems operation.

Significance
Artificial Intelligence advances, coupled with the ubiquity of computing in modern life, present scenarios in which knowledge of perception and judgment processes in human operators takes an increasingly important role in systems design and successful implementation and operation.

Applying human precepts of perception and judgment to the issues of user interfaces permits us to begin investigating, for example, the likely credibility that operators accord to their information systems as sources of information for decision making. In times where computer mediated communication is increasingly promotional in nature, in light of CRM and emerging micro segmentation paradigms of marketing, the ability to effectively diagnose and utilize human perceptual processes as an element of systems interfaces and operation will be critical. Prior literature has delved into these issues at the level of adoption choices, but user response to computer mediated information sources will be important to understand as AI systems begin to provide increasingly more and more important information in support of decision making in both personal and organizational life, as enhanced and supported by computer systems.

Invited Guests
I am inviting Art Graesser, Director of the Institute for Intelligent Systems at the FedEx Institute of Technology at the University of Memphis, to provide a presentation on his development of AI guided anthropomorphic avatars as computer interfaces for computer-mediated learning. I am also asking B.J. Fogg of the Stanford Computer Credibility project to participate in the minitrack, providing his own evolving views of how humans view and judge computers as sources of information important to decision making.

Topical Coverage
It is expected that the topic of Intelligent Avatars and human perceptions of and response to anthropomorphic interface entities will be a key topic of the track; as computers and their interfaces become more human-like in their presentation, the issue of human reactions to human-like computing stimuli will be important. I will also ensure that established reference discipline schools of thought on judgment and decision making will be included so that attendees may begin to examine new and potentially fruitful theoretical perspectives for the study and development of computer interfaces that increasingly serve as sources of information and guidance in human decision making. These literature streams that will be touched on include social judgment, communications theory, and cybernetic psychology.

Social cognition has not yet been introduced to this community of scholars, and some of the most important current developments in computing have to do with human perception, judgment, and decision making with, and often of and about, computers that present human-like visual and audible interfaces. As interfaces continue to more closely emulate the aspects of the human form and behavior (as in AI avatar interfaces), it will be critical to build theoretical perspectives that investigate human perception of computer interfaces as analogies of intelligent peers, rather than powerful user-directed tools.

IT/Systems Accessibility

Deborah Fels
Eleanor T. Loiacono
Scott McCoy


Accessibility is the ability of persons, regardless of ability, to easily access information, regardless of form, structure, or presentation. Fifty-four million Americans—nearly one in five—live with some form of disability (cognitive, visual, or audio) that makes accessing information difficult. Though great strides have been made during the past decade to accommodate those with special needs (including the development of numerous assistive technologies), there is still much to be done. For example, as the Internet and World Wide Web become an integral component of daily life, Web accessibility becomes more vital.

Accessibility goes beyond making information available for people with disabilities. Increasing accessibility may in turn increase use of systems by users without disabilities as well. Those with less powerful computers or slow Internet connections may find it preferable to purchase from accessible-friendly websites that require less bandwidth. For example, some might find it beneficial to surf the Web with the graphics function turned off, thus decreasing download time.

Given this broad definition of accessibility, a diverse group of research is expected from such areas as information systems, library science, education, computer science, and engineering. In fact, ACM held its first Web accessibility conference, called the First International Cross-disciplinary workshop on Web Accessibility, in New York City. The conference had three sessions and nine papers presented. Another ACM conference, the Fifth International ACM Conference on Assistive Technology held two sessions: Web accessibility and accessible interfaces. Further, a special issue of the Universal Access in the Information Society Journal, edited by the proposed mini-track co-chairs, will be published the first half of 2006 with papers from our minitrack at AMCIS.

Keywords: accessibility, usability, challenges, disabilities, assistive and adaptive technologies

Potential topics and research questions that this Mini-track would address include but are not limited to:

  • Accessibility
  • Internet and Web accessibility
  • Assistive technology
  • Adaptive technology
  • Accessibility within workforce
  • Usability

This topic was offered at the past two AMCIS conferences (2004 and 2005). Over 20 people attended each session in 2004 and 2005 where we organized one session each year. Top researchers in the field, such as Clyde Holsapple, Marilyn Tremaine, and Veda Story, have coauthored papers in our minitrack. The number of papers submitted and session attendees indicates the growing interest in the area which is also demonstrated by the growing number of research papers on this topic. Further the proposed mini-track co-chairs are co-chairing a mini-track on accessibility at HICSS 2006. Our minitrack at HICSS 2005 was very successful, as well.

Potential Authors and Reviewers
We have identified over 200 researchers actively studying Accessibility and have gathered many more names and emails at the AMCIS 2005 mini-track sessions. Given the interest in this area by Information Systems, computer science, library science, education, and engineering researchers, we believe there will be a number of papers submitted.

Personalization Systems

Il Im


Personalization is one of the new phenomena that the Internet has brought to reality from imagination. As personalized services and products are becoming more common on the Internet, the interest on personalization is growing. Many practitioners and researchers are investigating into various issues of personalization. Yet, there is a lot to be known about personalization technologies and their impacts.

Through this minitrack, we aim to examine technologies for personalization, the impacts of personalization, and better ways for personalizing products and services. We welcome empirical research through quantitative or qualitative methodologies including novel conceptualizations of information systems, analytical modeling approaches, case studies of implementations and experimental or prototyping-based studies.

The following topics are indicative of the areas that are of particular interest:

  • Personalization technologies such as recommendation systems and intelligent software
  • Theories and models for better understanding of personalization
  • Applications of personalization technologies
  • Impact of personalization systems on users’ behavior
  • The impacts of personalization systems on business
  • Identifying and implementing users’ various personalization needs
  • Best practices of personalization
  • Cross-cultural issues of personalization
  • Metrics for personalization success

Emergency Response Information Systems (Co-Sponsored by SIGDSS)

Tung Bui
Murray Turoff
Bartel Van de Walle


Any aspect of the design, development, deployment, operation, or evaluation of emergency response systems are appropriate for this mini-track provided it focuses on the tools, functionality, and/or interface the system provides to human users involved with emergency and crisis response. Also papers that focus on requirements for this environment and/or the impact or relationship of such systems to the behavior of the individuals or organizations involved are equally welcome.

Papers that focus on the underlying technology or hardware of computers, networks, sensors, mobile devices and their improvements in such areas as throughput, accuracy, and security, should be directed to other appropriate sessions. An exception might be any special purpose input/output device for use by respondents to a crisis situation.

This mini-track is concerned with the functionality that an Emergency Response Information System provides for those involved in:

  • Training for a crisis situation
  • Planning for the response to a crisis situation
  • Responding to a crisis situation
  • Evaluating the performance during and after the crises

HCI Issues in Healthcare IT (Co-Sponsored by SIGHealth)

Vance Wilson


In order to comply with changing regulations and to improve support for office staff, clinicians, and patients, healthcare organizations worldwide are currently undertaking massive transformations and additions to their IT infrastructure. History suggests that the success of the healthcare applications that emerge from this process will depend to a large degree on the ability of people to use them effectively and efficiently. Human-computer interaction (HCI) research can provide valuable guidance to improve the usability of healthcare IT. Potential exists for HCI researchers to apply existing knowledge to improving healthcare IT as well as to formulate new theories and practices specific to the healthcare context. The goal of this minitrack is to provide a focused outlet at AMCIS for HCI researchers in healthcare domains to share and discuss the results of their work. Research is welcomed on any HCI topic relating to healthcare IT.

List of Possible topics:

  • Innovative HCI design and/or prototyping methods in healthcare
  • Usability engineering for healthcare IT
  • UI evaluation methods in healthcare
  • Behavioral and cognitive aspects of HCI in healthcare
  • Impacts of HCI on success or failure of healthcare IT
  • User interface (UI) design practices for reducing errors in healthcare IT
  • Application of HCI research to improving telemedicine
  • UI development for patient-centered information systems, providing such functions as communication, health records access, and remote monitoring and treatment
  • Accessibility and other HCI issues relating to special needs populations, including elderly patients, the chronically ill, and caregivers
  • Impacts of regulation (e.g., for privacy and security) on usability
  • HCI aspects relating to electronic medical records (institutional and/or personal)
  • HCI and mobile devices used in healthcare
  • Standards and guiding principles for UI design in healthcare
  • Developing and teaching HCI courses for healthcare IT

HCI with Mobile Devices (Co-Sponsored by SIGEBIZ)

Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah
Peter Tarasewich


Mobile applications are having a profound impact on organizations and individuals. Organizations no longer need to provide every employee with a wired connection to perform their job functions. Individuals can use mobile devices to access the information systems they need anywhere at anytime. But mobility and mobile device use is also adding to problems of information overload. Information management becomes more difficult and complex in mobile environments as well. Since mobile devices can be taken anywhere, the user’s environment can change rapidly from moment to moment. There can also be a significant number of people, objects, and activities vying for a user’s attention aside from the mobile application itself.

Designing effective interaction methods is a challenging part of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), and mobile devices make this challenge even greater. Mobile applications require efficient ways to record and access information under circumstances that are often quite different from those where desktop computers are used. The purpose of this mini-track is to provide a forum for examining how people interact with mobile information systems and the devices that are used to access them. Submissions addressing all aspects of HCI with mobile devices are welcome.

Possible Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Novel interaction and interface design for mobile devices (e.g., phones, PDAs)
  • Usability testing methods for wireless applications
  • HCI security (HCI-SEC) for mobile devices and interactions
  • Field tests of mobile information systems
  • Case studies looking at the usability of mobile applications
  • Formal user studies of mobile device interaction techniques
  • Designing privacy into mobile applications and devices
  • Notification cues and displays for wearable devices
  • Wearable systems and computing
  • Input and output methods for ultra-mobile devices (e.g., watches, rings)

This mini-track was part of AMCIS 2005, and is an extension and progression of mini-tracks in the wireless, m-commerce, and HCI fields that both mini-track co-chairs have been successfully running since 2001. Last year there were two excellent manuscripts submitted and accepted to this mini-track, and this year it is expected that there will be at least 4-6 submissions. This area is a growing sub-field of both HCI and wireless information systems that is receiving increasing emphasis from academia and industry. It is being cross-listed with two tracks, and again is being sponsored by two very popular SIGs.

Information Visualization and Decision Support (Co-Sponsored by SIGDSS)

Ozgur Turetken
David Schuff


The abundance of information available to today’s managers makes it essential to efficiently represent, filter, and present information for effective decision making. The rapid advances in hardware and software development have made it possible to present data visually from multiple perspectives. However, the challenge is the design of visualizations such that (1) they are useful in presenting non-numeric as well numeric information, and (2) they are integrated with other components of existing decision support systems.

From that perspective, the topic of information visualization spans several disciplines, including decision support and human-computer interaction. Specifically, the graphical presentation of information applies to an array of topics such as data modeling, interface design, data mining, and data warehousing.

This track was extremely successful this year at AMCIS 2005. We had three papers presented during the session, which was attended by nearly 40 people. Based on this success, we are confident this mini-track will continue to attract quality submissions that focus on the design, development, and use of information visualization, as well as its ability to function as a tool to aid managerial decision-making.

Keywords: Information visualization, data visualization, decision-making, decision support systems, visual interface development

List of Possible Topics

  • Techniques for the organization of information (e.g., clustering)
  • Visual presentation of data mining results
  • Design of visual interfaces that facilitate decision support
  • Evaluation of visual interfaces especially from a decision effectiveness perspective
  • Application of animation techniques to the presentation of information

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Matt Germonprez
Traci Hess
Scott McCoy


HCI papers that do not fall into any of the above minitracks should be submitted to the HCI minitrack. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The behavioral, cognitive, and motivational aspects of human/computer interaction
  • User task analysis and modeling
  • The analysis, design, development, evaluation, and use of information systems
  • Guidelines and standards for interface design
  • User interface design and evaluation of the Web for
    • B2B, B2C, C2C E-Commerce
    • Group collaboration
    • Negotiation and auction
  • Design and evaluation issues for small screen devices and M-Commerce
  • Interface issues in the development of other new interaction technologies
  • Information system usability engineering
  • The impact of interfaces/information technology on attitudes, behavior, performance, perception, and productivity
  • Implications and consequences of technological change on individuals, groups, society, and socio-technical units
  • Issues related to the elderly, the young, and special needs populations
  • Issues in teaching HCI courses
  • Other human factors issues related to HCI

Track Chairs:

Dr. Scott McCoy, College of William and Mary, scott.mccoy@business.wm.edu
Dr. Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, fnah@unl.edu
Dr. Mun Yi, University of South Carolina,  myi@moore.sc.edu

Track Description:

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary field that has attracted researchers, educators, and practitioners from different disciplines. HCI has gained attention during recent years due to the rapid development and advancement in information and computer technology. To better use advanced technology, we need to better understand users, their tasks within different contexts, and the interplay among users, tasks, and contexts/environments.

In the MIS field, broad HCI issues and research questions have been investigated over a long period of time. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) or Human Factors studies in MIS are concerned with the ways humans interact with information, technologies, and tasks, especially in business, managerial, organizational, and cultural contexts. MIS researchers are interested in macro level analyses and issues, and they study these issues in the organizational/business contexts or take these contexts into consideration in their studies.

The high level of interest exhibited by MIS scholars in broad HCI studies has been demonstrated in many ways:

  1. The high number of hits from queries to the ISWORLD Faculty Directory on research and teaching in HCI related areas (see Zhang et al., 2002 in CAIS);
  2. The high level of participation in HCI specific events sponsored by the AIS SIGHCI (please refer to http://sigs.aisnet.org/sighci for more information);
  3. The high level of participation in HCI minitrack/track at AMCIS 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005. At the last four AMCIS conferences, the HCI in MIS minitrack (which became the HCI in MIS track at AMCIS 2004) was among the most popular ones at AMCIS.

This increasing trend of interest and enthusiasm was exhibited by the large number of submissions and the high level of participation during the last few years. A meta/mega track is necessary so that (1) it is possible to attend to specific research areas within HCI in MIS, (2) more HCI researchers can be involved, play important organizing roles, and make an impact in this area, and (3) the overall reviewing process for submissions in this area can be more efficiently and better managed.

The aim of this track is consistent with the HCI in MIS track/minitrack in previous years at AMCIS. We want to provide a forum for AIS members to acknowledge each other’s work, and to discuss, develop, and promote a range of issues related to HCI in MIS, including the history, reference disciplines, theories, practice, methodologies and techniques, new development, and applications of the interaction between humans, information and information technology. In an effort to bridge academic research and industry practice, both research articles and experience reports are welcome. The track is open to all types of research methodologies (e.g., conceptualization, theorization, case study, action research, experimentation, survey, simulation). We also welcome visionary articles and research in progress papers..


Special Issue of the International Journal of Human Computer Studies

(7/4/2005)

To continue the AIS SIGHCI tradition, we will have a special issue of a high quality refereed academic journal, International Journal of Human-Computer Studies (IJHCS), to publish the expansions of the best papers from the HCI track. We thank the co-editors-in-chief of IJHCS, E. Motta and S. Wiedenbeck, for accepting our proposal and for their strong support of the importance of HCI research in the MIS discipline. The guest editors for this special issue are Fiona Nah, Ping Zhang, Scott McCoy, & Mun Yi.

Best completed research papers from participating HCI mini-tracks will be considered for the special issue.


Mini-Tracks:

Information Technology Systems Accessibility

Eleanor Loiacono
Scott McCoy
Nicholas Romano


Description: Accessibility is the ability of persons, regardless of ability, to easily access information, regardless of form, structure, or presentation. Fifty-four million Americans—nearly one in five—live with some form of disability (cognitive, visual, or audio) that makes accessing information difficult. Though great strides have been made during the past decade to accommodate those with special needs (including the development of numerous assistive technologies), there is still much to be done. For example, as the Internet and World Wide Web become an integral component of daily life, Web accessibility becomes more vital.
Accessibility goes beyond making information available for people with disabilities. Increasing accessibility may in turn increase use of systems by users without disabilities as well. Those with less powerful computers or slow Internet connections may find it preferable to purchase from accessible-friendly websites that require less bandwidth. For example, some might find it beneficial to surf the Web with the graphics function turned off, thus decreasing download time. Given this broad definition of accessibility, a number of research perspectives are expected from such areas as Information Systems, Information Science, Library Science, Education, Computer Science, and Engineering.

Potential topics and research questions that this Mini-track would address includes but is not limited to:

– Accessibility
– Internet and Web Accessibility
– Assistive Technology
– Adaptive Technology
– Accessibility within Workforce
– Usability

Submission guidelines:
1. Submit abstracts via email to the co-chairs by February 1, 2005. This is an important step to ensure that you have submitted your paper to the correct mini-track.
2. Final papers will be submitted via the AIS Review System, deadline is March 1, 2005. See the conference website for details: http://amcis2005.isqa.unomaha.edu/.
3. Copyright Information: Submission of a paper to the conference represents the author’s agreement to allow AIS to publish the paper in any written or electronic format for distribution to all interested parties in perpetuity with or without compensation to AIS and without compensation to the author. The parties understand that the author is granting a nonexclusive license and all copyrights remain the property of the author.

HCI with Mobile Devices (co-sponsored by SIGEBIZ)

Peter Tarasewich
Fiona Nah


Mobile applications are having a profound impact on organizations and individuals. Organizations no longer need to provide every employee with a wired connection to perform their job functions. Individuals can use mobile devices to access the information systems they need anywhere at anytime. But mobility and mobile device use is also adding to problems of information overload. Information management becomes more difficult and complex in mobile environments as well. Since mobile devices can be taken anywhere, the user’s environment can change rapidly from moment to moment. There can also be a significant number of people, objects, and activities vying for a user’s attention aside from the mobile application itself.

Designing effective interaction methods is a challenging part of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), and mobile devices make this challenge even greater. Mobile applications require efficient ways to record and access information under circumstances that are often quite different from those where desktop computers are used. The purpose of this mini-track is to provide a forum for examining how people interact with mobile information systems and the devices that are used to access them. Submissions describing original research or case studies related to all information systems aspects of HCI with mobile devices are welcome.

Possible Topics include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Interface design for mobile devices
  • Usability testing methods for wireless applications
  • Securing mobile devices and interactions
  • Field tests of mobile information systems
  • Designing privacy into mobile applications
  • Notification cues or displays for wearable devices
  • Wearable systems and computing
  • Input and output methods for ultra-mobile devices (e.g., watches, rings)

Please contact the Chairs with any questions concerning the suitability of topics for this mini-track. Potential authors are also encouraged to look at the other related mini-tracks sponsored by both SIG HCI and SIGeBIZ at AMCIS 2005.

Decision Support, Knowledge and Data Management
(Sponsored by SIGHCI)
Information Visualization and Decision Support (co-sponsored by SIGDSS)

David Schuff
Ozgur Turetken


The abundance of information available to today’s managers makes it essential to efficiently represent, filter, and present information for effective decision making. The rapid advances in hardware and software development have made it possible to present data visually from multiple perspectives. However, the challenge is the design of visualizations such that (1) they are useful in presenting non-numeric as well numeric information, and (2) they are integrated with other components of existing decision support systems.

From that perspective, the topic of information visualization spans several disciplines, including decision support and human-computer interaction. Specifically, the graphical presentation of information applies to an array of topics such as data modeling, interface design, data mining, and data warehousing. This mini-track will focus on the design, development, and use of information visualization, as well as its ability to function as a tool to aid managerial decision-making.

List of Possible Topics

• Techniques for the organization of information (e.g., clustering)
• Visual presentation of data mining results
• Design of visual interfaces that facilitate decision support
• Evaluation of visual interfaces especially from a decision effectiveness perspective
• Application of animation techniques to the presentation of information

For more information, please visit:

http://mis.temple.edu/sigdss/amcis05iv

Decision Support, Knowledge and Data Management
(Sponsored by SIGHCI)
Emergency Response Systems (co-sponsored by SIGDSS)

Murray Turoff
Bartel Van de Walle


Any aspect of the design, development, deployment, operation, or evaluation of emergency response systems are appropriate for this mini-track provided it focuses on the tools, functionality, and/or interface the system provides to human users involved with emergency and crisis response. Also papers that focus on requirements for this environment and/or the impact or relationship of such systems to the behavior of the individuals or organizations involved are equally welcome.

Papers that focus on the underlying technology or hardware of computers, networks, sensors, mobile devices and their improvements in such areas as throughput, accuracy, and security, should be directed to other appropriate sessions. An exception might be any special purpose input/output device for use by respondents to a crisis situation.

This mini-track is concerned with the functionality that Emergency Response Information System provides for those involved in:

– Training for a crisis situation
– Planning for the response to a crisis situation
– Responding to a crisis situation
– Evaluating the performance during and after the crises

Human Computer Interaction Models and Issues in Information Seeking Engines (co-sponsored by SIGSEMIS)

Rick Downing
Joi Moore


Description:
For information seeking to be effective, it should perhaps be conceptualized as a problem solving process, rather than a search for key terms. In order to address the problem solving characteristics of information seeking, the user interface in the electronic information seeking environment should provide methods for conducting natural language conversations between the user and the system. Information problems should be addressed incrementally with the system providing feedback designed to help the user narrow or broaden the scope of their search or increase domain knowledge regarding the topic of their search. In this way, the user can incrementally enhance their understanding of both the problem and potential solutions. Thus, search engines of the future should conduct an interactive conversation with the information seeker while incrementally narrowing the search with each conversational exchange and providing an incrementally finer description of the type of information sought prior to beginning the search.

Email spam can be greatly reduced through the use of Bayesian spam filters. These innovative agents learn from both spam email and acceptable email assigning scores to various aspects of the content of each message and determine whether to reject an email message based upon the overall score. Great progress has also been made in the use of both semantic web designs and ontologies. Perhaps it is time to reverse the paradigm from one in which humans query the system to one in which the system queries humans.

Relevance for MIS:
The development of intelligent information seeking engines has broad implications for library information systems, knowledge management systems, database systems used in support of decision support and data mining, as well as for general use in Internet searching.

We are seeking original research that develops, tests, advances, or applies theory, research, and knowledge to all areas of intelligent information seeking technology. Articles with both strong theoretical foundations and significant practical implications are highly encouraged.

Conceptual models, literature reviews, exploratory research, descriptive surveys, methodological studies, applied research, and replications or extensions of past research are of interest if they make an important contribution to human problem solving, intelligent agent, or AI theory, research, or knowledge, and provide insight for academic application or business practice. All types of rigorous methods (quantitative, qualitative, or combination) are acceptable.

Suggested Topics:Some suggested topics are listed below. Questions regarding the suitability of your topic should be addressed to the mini-track chairs.

• human problem solving processes
• intelligent search agents
• artificial intelligence and information seeking
• ontologies and information seeking
• innovative uses of Bayesian filters
• cognitive processes (or constraints) in information seeking
• interactive user interfaces
• semantic web engines
• natural language filters

Submission guidelines:
1. Submit abstracts via email to the co-chairs by February 1, 2005. This is an important step to ensure that you have submitted your paper to the correct mini-track.

2. Papers will be submitted via the AIS Review System, deadline is March 1, 2005. See the conference website for details.

3. Copyright Information: Submission of a paper to the conference represents the author’s agreement to allow AIS to publish the paper in any written or electronic format for distribution to all interested parties in perpetuity with or without compensation to AIS and without compensation to the author. The parties understand that the author is granting a nonexclusive license and all copyrights remain the property of the author.

Personalization Systems

Il Im


Personalization is one of the new phenomena that the Internet has brought to reality from imagination. As personalized services and products are becoming more common on the Internet, the interest on personalization is growing. Many practitioners and researchers are investigating into various issues of personalization. Yet, there is a lot to be known about personalization technologies and their impacts.

Through this minitrack, we aim to examine technologies for personalization, the impacts of personalization, and better ways for personalizing products and services. We welcome empirical research through quantitative or qualitative methodologies including novel conceptualizations of information systems, analytical modeling approaches, case studies of implementations and experimental or prototyping-based studies.

The following topics are indicative of the areas that are of particular interest:

– Personalization technologies such as recommendation systems and intelligent software
– Theories and models for better understanding of personalization
– Applications of personalization technologies
– Impact of personalization systems on users’ behavior
– The impacts of personalization systems on business
– Identifying and implementing users’ various personalization needs
– Best practices of personalization
– Cross-cultural issues of personalization
– Metrics for personalization success

Interface Design, Evaluation, and Impact

Scott McCoy
Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah
Mun Yi


This minitrack accepts HCI papers that do not fall into any of the following minitracks under the HCI track:

1. Information Technology Systems Accessibility;
2. Personalization Systems;
3. HCI with Mobile Devices (co-sponsored by SIGEBIZ);
4. Human Computer Interaction Models and Issues in Information Seeking Engines (co-sponsored by SIGSEMIS);
5. Emergency Response Systems (co-sponsored by SIGDSS);
6. Information Visualization and Decision Support (co-sponsored by SIGDSS).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

• The behavioral, cognitive, and motivational aspects of human/computer interaction
• The analysis, design, development, evaluation, and use of information systems
• User interface design and evaluation of the Web for
– B2B, B2C, C2C E-Commerce
– Group collaboration
– Negotiation and auction
• The impact of interfaces/information technology on attitudes, behavior, performance, perception, and productivity
• Design, evaluation, and impact issues for small screen devices and M-Commerce
• User task analysis and modeling
• Information system usability engineering
• Guidelines and standards for interface design
• Interface issues in the development of other new interaction technologies
• Implications and consequences of technological change on individuals, groups, society, and socio-technical units
• Issues related to the elderly, the young and special needs populations
• Issues in teaching HCI courses
• Other human factors issues related to HCI

Track Chairs:

Dr. Scott McCoy, College of William and Mary, scott.mccoy@business.wm.edu
Dr. Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, fnah@unl.edu
Dr. Ping Zhang, Syracuse University,  pzhang@syr.edu

HCI Minitrack Summary

(11/3/2005)

At AMCIS 2004, SIGHCI sponsored the HCI track comprising 7 mini-tracks and one tutorial. They were:

  1. “IT Accessibility” mini-track, co-chaired by Eleanor T. Loiacono, Scott McCoy, & Nicholas C. Romano, Jr.
  2. “Personalization Systems” mini-track, chaired by Il Im
  3. “Pervasive IS” mini-track, co-chaired by Starr Roxanne Hiltz & Quentin Jones
  4. “IT Implementation & Use” mini-track, co-chaired by Andrew Schwarz & Wynne W. Chin
  5. “Information Retrieval & Human Language Technologies” mini-track, co-chaired by Praveen Pathak & Dmitri Roussinov
  6. “Emergency Response IS” mini-track, co-chaired by Murray Turoff & Bartel Van de Walle
  7. “HCI Studies in MIS” mini-track, co-chaired by Scott McCoy, Fiona Nah, & Ping Zhang
  8. “Integrating HCI in SDLC” tutorial by Ping Zhang, Jane Carey, Dov Te’eni, & Marilyn Tremaine

These minitracks and tutorial formed 17 sessions – 16 paper sessions and 1 tutorial – that spanned the entire conference in 2 parallel sessions. The sessions were well attended, indicating the high level of interest from the MIS community in HCI-related research. We thank the authors, session chairs, reviewers, and participants for their contributions and for making the HCI track a very successful one at AMCIS 2004.

Six papers were nominated for the best paper award in the HCI track:

  • “Visualizing Cyber Personality,” Su-e Park, Dongsung Choi, & Jinwoo Kim
  • “An Empirical Examination of the Effects of Web Personalization,” Susanna S. Ho & Kar Yan Tam
  • “IS Value at the Individual Level: Analyzing the Role of Nature of IS Use,” Vikas Jain & Kanungo Shivraj
  • “The Role of Computer User Aptitude in Technology Acceptance: An Exploratory Study,” Janis Warner, Xenophon Koufteros, & Qing Hu
  • “Impacts of User Interface Complexity on User Acceptance in Safety-Critical Systems,” Erman Coskun & Martha Grabowski
  • “Interpreting Scenario-Based Design from an Information Systems Perspective,” Gregorio Convertino & Umer Farooq

The best paper award for the HCI track went to Su-e Park, Dongsung Choi, and Jinwoo Kim for their paper, “Visualizing Cyber Personality.” We congratulate them for receiving the best paper award and for having completed an outstanding piece of research in HCI.

Authors of best completed papers were invited to submit expanded versions of their papers for consideration and fast-tracking in a SIGHCI-sponsored special issue of International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction (IJHCI). Only papers that have successfully undergone at least two rounds of rigorous review process will be published in the special issue, which is expected to be published at the end of 2005 or beginning of 2006.

The tutorial on “Integrating HCI in Systems Development Life Cycle” provides rationales and a methodology of considering HCI issues while developing organizational information systems. The methodology ties the typical modern systems analysis and design considerations with a set of HCI considerations during each stage of the systems development life cycle. The tutorial was delivered by Ping Zhang, Jane Carey, Dov Te’eni, and Marilyn Tremaine. An expansion of the tutorial will be published in Communications of the AIS.

We thank all participants for the success of the HCI track and we look forward to sponsoring the HCI track at AMCIS 2005 in Omaha, Nebraska! We also look forward to seeing you at the 3rd pre-ICIS HCI/MIS workshop in Washington, D.C. and future SIGHCI sponsored events!


Special Issue of the International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction

(5/26/2004)

To continue the AIS SIGHCI tradition, we will have a special issue of a high quality refereed academic journal to publish the expansions of the best papers from the HCI track. This year, the journal is the International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction. The co-editors-in-chief, Dr. Gavriel Salvendy (Purdue University) and Dr. Kay M. Stanney (University of Central Florida), accepted our proposal as an exception! We are very thankful for their strong support and appreciation of the importance of HCI research in the MIS discipline. The guest editors for this special issue are Fiona Nah, Ping Zhang and Scott McCoy.

Best complete research papers from the participating HCI mini-tracks will be considered for the special issue.

Participating minitracks:
  • Mini-track #2. Personalization Systems
  • Mini-track #4. IT Implementation and Use: Going Beyond Intentions and Perception
  • Mini-track #5. Information Retrieval and Human Language Technologies
  • Mini-track #7. Human-Computer Interaction studies in MIS
Tentative Timetable:
  • 6/15/04: invitation
  • 8/15/04: 1st submission
  • 10/15/04: notification of first review
  • 12/1/04: 2nd submission
  • 2/1/05: final notification
  • 2/15/05: final revisions due

To view the content of the special issue, please click here

CFP of HCI Mini-track 1: Accessibility

Chairs: Eleanor T. Loiacono-Mello (eloiacon@wpi.edu), Scott McCoy (Scott.McCoy@business.wm.edu), Nicholas C. Romano, Jr. (Nicholas-Romano@MSTM.OKState.EDU)

URL: http://users.wpi.edu/~eloiacon/AMCIS2004/accessminitrack.htm

Accessibility is the ability of persons, regardless of ability, to easily access information, regardless of form, structure, or presentation. Fifty-four million Americans-nearly one in five-live with some form of disability (cognitive, visual, or audio) that makes accessing information difficult. Though great strides have been made during the past decade to accommodate those with special needs (including the development of numerous assistive technologies), there is still much to be done. For example, as the Internet and World Wide Web become an integral component of daily life, Web accessibility becomes more vital.

Accessibility goes beyond making information available for people with disabilities. Increasing accessibility may in turn increase use of systems by users without disabilities as well. Those with less powerful computers or slow Internet connections may find it preferable to purchase from accessible-friendly websites that require less bandwidth. For example, some might find it beneficial to surf the Web with the graphics function turned off, thus decreasing download time. Given this broad definition of accessibility, a number of research perspectives are expected from such areas as Information Systems, Information Science, Library Science, Education, Computer Science, and Engineering.

Potential topics and research questions that this Mini-track would address includes but is not limited to:

  • Accessibility
  • Internet and Web Accessibility
  • Assistive Technology
  • Adaptive Technology
  • Accessibility within Workforce
  • Usability

CFP of HCI Mini-track 2: Personalization Systems

Chair: Il Im (il.im@njit.edu)

Personalization is one of the new phenomena that the Internet has brought to reality from imagination. As personalized services and products are becoming more common on the Internet, the interest on personalization is growing. Many practitioners and researchers are investigating into various issues of personalization. Yet, there is a lot to be known about personalization technologies and their impacts.

Through this minitrack, we aim to examine technologies for personalization, the impacts of personalization, and better ways for personalizing products and services. We welcome empirical research through quantitative or qualitative methodologies including novel conceptualizations of information systems, analytical modeling approaches, case studies of implementations and experimental or prototyping-based studies.

The following topics are indicative of the areas that are of particular interest:

  • Personalization technologies such as recommendation systems and intelligent software
  • Theories and models for better understanding of personalization
  • Applications of personalization technologies
  • Impact of personalization systems on users’ behavior
  • The impacts of personalization systems on business
  • Identifying and implementing users’ various personalization needs
  • Best practices of personalization
  • Cross-cultural issues of personalization
  • Metrics for personalization success

CFP of HCI Mini-track 3: Pervasive Information Systems

Chairs: Starr Roxanne Hiltz (Hiltz@njit.edu), Quentin Jones (qgjones@acm.org)

URL:

Pervasive information systems use increasingly ubiquitous and connected computing devices to allow people to work with information anywhere, at any time. These systems can be embedded in the environment, augment user’s everyday experiences in a “contextualized” fashion, or be worn. Just as the PC transformed both business and personal life in the 1990s, a new generation of information appliances is transforming our lives including how we work, are entertained and study, manage our home environment, and are governed.

This Mini Track solicits papers on the social issues and impacts associated with any “pervasive” or “highly mobile” system. In particular, it calls for studies of pervasive information systems and:

  • Privacy. Ubiquitous computing conjures visions of big and little brother, and ever-diminishing privacy. But it also opens up new forms of communication, collaboration and social relations.
  • Community. Pervasive information systems can be used to support communities of practice, geographic community, and virtual community by enabling location or context aware data capture and retrieval. They can be used to support social interaction and face-to-face communication. Such services could be based on the ability to either track individuals as they go from one location to another or detect when they interact with each other or with various “smart” objects embedded in the space.
  • Commerce. Ubiquitous computing enables new forms of commerce including M-commerce (mobile), L-Commerce (location), and S-Commerce (silent). This mini-track is interested in ubiquitous computing enabled commerce with a direct user or social impact.

CFP of HCI Mini-track 4: IT Implementation and Use: Going Beyond Intentions and Perception

Chairs: Andrew Schwarz (aschwarz@lsu.edu), Wynne W. Chin (wchin@uh.edu)

URL: /amcis04/4_it_imp_use_minitrack.html

IT management is constantly under attack. Budgetary pressures and a global competitive business environment have forced the IT department to make an immediate impact upon their organizations that is quantifiable and directly measurable. While the type of technology has changed through the years, practitioners have faced an enduring battle to justify new IT systems and their influence upon productivity and efficiency.

The academic literature has a long tradition of understanding how people use technology, with early innovation researchers such as Gabriel Tarde (1903) introducing the S-shaped diffusion curve and Bryce Ryan and Neal Gross (1940’s) studying the diffusion of hybrid seeds among Iowa farmers. Recently, work by Everett Rogers (1983) and Fred Davis (1989) have included the perceptions of individuals and how these cognitive orientations link towards technology usage. While such work has helped us focus on intentions and perceptions, the next step is linking them to the bottom-line impacts that IT and business management needs to understand.

This mini-track is devoted to examining different types of technology usage and perceptions as they link to individual and organizational performance. Some possible topics include:

  • Studies that seek to define new measures and new types of productivity and usage, both at the individual and/or organizational levels.
  • Research that examines the relationship between technology acceptance and different types of usage
  • Investigations into technology diffusion and the organizational impact of the rate of diffusion

CFP of HCI Mini-track 5: Information Retrieval and Human Language Technologies

Chairs: Praveen Pathak (praveen@ufl.edu), Dmitri Roussinov (dmitri.roussinov@asu.edu)

URL: http://bear.cba.ufl.edu/pathak/IR_HLT_AMCIS2004_CFP.htm

As knowledge becomes a central productive and strategic asset, the success of organizations increasingly depends on their ability to effectively gather, produce, maintain, and disseminate information and knowledge. Modern corporate knowledge bases contain large numbers of manuals, procedures, documentation, expert knowledge, e-mail archives, news resources, and technical reports – all in the form of unstructured natural language text. That is why, the importance of processing information stored in unstructured form is growing at a rapid pace and is as vital as processing the data stored in the structured form (relational tables). However, finding, interpreting and summarizing relevant information contained in the free text form still remains an extremely challenging task, requiring collaboration of multiple disciplines. The field of Human Language Technologies is currently emerging from such disciplines as Information Retrieval (IR), Artificial Intelligence (AI), Computational Linguistics (CL), and Human Computer Interaction (HCI), and has been gaining significant attention among academicians and practitioners. This mini-track invites theoretical, experimental, or applied papers that are expected to advance this field.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to the following:

  • information retrieval, extraction, filtering and summarization
  • text mining, semantic similarity discovery, maps, domain modeling and ontology-building
  • WWW, network, hypertext -based information retrieval systems
  • natural language interfaces
  • question answering systems
  • topic detection and tracking
  • evaluation and testing of knowledge management systems
  • user interfaces for knowledge management systems, user models and profiling
  • hypermedia/multimedia indexing and retrieval
  • integrating knowledge sources and knowledge representation techniques
  • integrating databases and text retrieval systems
  • commercial applications of knowledge management systems, search engines
  • security aspects of knowledge management systems, deception detection in communication

CFP of HCI Mini-track 6: Emergency Response Information Systems (Co-sponsored by SIGDSS)

Chairs: Murray Turoff (turoff@njit.edu), Bartel Van de Walle (bartel@uvt.nl)

URL: http://web.njit.edu/~turoff/Proposedamcistrack.htm

Any aspect of the design, development, deployment, operation, or evaluation of emergency response systems are appropriate for this mini-track provided it focuses on the tools, functionality, and/or interface the system provides to human users involved with emergency and crisis response. Also papers that focus on requirements for this environment and/or the impact or relationship of such systems to the behavior of the individuals or organizations involved are equally welcome.

Papers that focus on the underlying technology or hardware of computers, networks, sensors, mobile devices and their improvements in such areas as throughput, accuracy, and security, should be directed to other appropriate sessions. An exception might be any special purpose input/output device for direct use by respondents to a crisis situation.

This mini-track is concerned with the functionality that Emergency Response Information System provides for those involved in:

  • Training for a crisis situation
  • Planning for the response to a crisis situation
  • Responding to a crisis situation
  • Evaluating the performance during and after the crises

CFP of the HCI mini-track 7: Human-Computer Interaction Studies in MIS

Abstracts should be send to all three HCI mini-track co-chairs: Scott McCoy (scott.mccoy@business.wm.edu), Fiona Nah (fnah@unl.edu), and Ping Zhang (pzhang@syr.edu).

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The behavioral, cognitive, motivational, and affective aspects of human/computer interaction
  • User task analysis and modeling
  • Digital documents/genres and human information seeking behavior
  • User interface design and evaluation of the Web for
    • B2B, B2C, C2C E-Commerce
    • E-marketplace and supply chain management
    • Group collaboration
    • Negotiation and auction
    • Enterprise systems
    • Intranets
    • Extranets
  • Integrated and/or innovative approaches, guidelines, and standards for analysis, design, and development of interactive devices and systems,
  • Design of computer interfaces for single-user or collaborative decision support, including design of standard computer interfaces, as well as design for small-screen mobile devices and pervasive computing
  • Development and applications of multi-dimensional information visualizations
  • Usability engineering; metrics and methods for user interface assessment and evaluation
  • Usability studies for end-user computing in work or non-work environment, especially in the Internet era
  • Information technology acceptance and diffusion issues from cognitive, motivational, cultural, and user interface design perspectives
  • The impact of interfaces/information technology on attitudes, behavior, performance, perception, and productivity
  • Issues in software learning and training, including perceptual, cognitive, and motivational aspects of learning
  • Gender and technology
  • Issues related to the elderly, the young and special needs populations
  • Issues in teaching HCI courses
  • Other human factors issues related to HCI